Make us your home page
Instagram
Career Q&A | By Marie G. McIntyre, McClatchy-Tribune Newspapers

MBA has benefits beyond just classes

Q: I'm planning to enroll in an MBA program that allows me to continue working while attending school. However, I'm beginning to wonder whether this degree will be worth the effort.

After putting so much time and money into my education, I would hope for some sort of financial reward, but my company does not give pay increases for master's degrees. I would be willing to change jobs or relocate if it meant that my degree would be recognized. How beneficial is an MBA?

A: I think you can safely assume that having an MBA will strengthen your resume and expand your career options. Even if you receive no immediate compensation bump, the odds of an eventual financial payoff are quite good. Several studies have found that MBA grads tend to earn more than their lesser-degreed counterparts.

Although you have been focusing on the end result, you should also consider the value of the process. In addition to getting a "ticket," you will acquire extensive business knowledge that can increase your effectiveness in almost any job. By the time you finish school, you may be amazed at how your perspective has changed.

As an added benefit, interaction with people from various backgrounds will acquaint you with a variety of industries and corporate cultures. Your fellow students can become valuable networking contacts, possibly facilitating future career opportunities. Many graduates have said they gained as much from their classmates as they did from their classes.

If you still have lingering doubts, consider contacting some alumni to ask about their experience. I'm betting that anyone who finished the program will believe the benefits far outweighed the costs.

New employee's extra effort is irritating co-workers

Q: My co-workers seem to despise me because I have a strong work ethic. When I took this job six months ago, I joined a team of three other people who have all been with the company at least six years. I love what I do, so I work a lot of overtime.

Now I'm in a pickle because my co-workers don't appreciate the "new kid on the block" working extra hours and exceeding our goals. Even though their negative remarks hurt my feelings, I'm not the sort of person who can fly under the radar.

Unfortunately, my boss seems to agree with my team members, so I can't go to her for help. What should I do?

A: New employees who make their co-workers look bad are inevitably resented. That's just human nature. Your eagerness to work overtime automatically implies that your teammates are less dedicated, even though some of them may not have the option of staying late.

You therefore face a difficult choice. You can continue accumulating extra hours and alienating your colleagues, or you can work the same hours as everyone else and no longer stand out from the pack.

Only you can decide which approach is best. However, since your boss apparently doesn't appreciate your extra effort, I do wonder exactly what your motivation is.

Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace coach and the author of "Secrets to Winning at Office Politics."

MBA has benefits beyond just classes 04/30/11 [Last modified: Saturday, April 30, 2011 4:31am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Tribune News Service.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa International Airport morphing into a mini-city unto itself

    Airlines

    TAMPA — By the end of the 2026, Joe Lopano wants Tampa International Airport to function as its own little city.

    Artist rendering of phase two of the $1 billion construction expansion of Tampa International Airport. The airport is transforming 17 acres of airport property that will include at least one hotel, retail and office space and a gas station, among other things.
[Courtesy of Tampa International Airport]
  2. Lost Highway: As FHP struggles to recruit, speeding tickets plummet

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The number of speeding tickets written by Florida state troopers has plunged three straight years as the agency grapples with a personnel shortage and high turnover.

    State data shows FHP troopers are not writing violations for speeding or other infractions like they did back in 2011, even though there's 1 million more licensed drivers in Florida.
  3. Kidpreneurs — and adults — capitalize on gooey, squishy Slime craze

    Retail

    Aletheia Venator and Berlyn Perdomo demonstrate the stretchiness of their slime. - Berlyn Perdomo and her friend, Aletheia Venator, both 13, make and sell slime which can be seen on their instagram site @the.real.slimeshadyy [JIM DAMASKE   |   Times]
  4. The last farmer of Florida's prized Zellwood corn is thinking of packing it in

    Consumer

    MOUNT DORA — Hank Scott steps out of his pickup between the long rows and snaps off an ear that grows about bellybutton-high on the forehead-high stalks.

    Hank Scott, co-owner of Long and Scott Farms, shucks an ear of corn on the farm in Mount Dora, Fla., on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The farm specializes in Scott's Zellwood Triple-Sweet Gourmet Corn. LOREN ELLIOTT   |   Times
  5. Law firm's Russia ties prove nothing about Trump

    Business

    The statement

    "Law firm @POTUS used to show he has no ties to Russia was named Russia Law Firm of the Year for their extensive ties to Russia. Unreal."

    Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., stands during a media availability on Capitol Hill, Monday, June 20, 2016 in Washington. A divided Senate blocked rival election-year plans to curb guns on Monday, eight days after the horror of Orlando's mass shooting intensified pressure on lawmakers to act but knotted them in gridlock anyway — even over restricting firearms for terrorists. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)