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McDonald's workers protest wages at annual meeting

Workers, organizers and supporters gather at McDonald’s Corp. headquarters in Oak Brook, Ill., on Thursday advocating a $15 hourly wage. “We believe we pay fair and competitive wages,” CEO Don Thompson said.

Associated Press

Workers, organizers and supporters gather at McDonald’s Corp. headquarters in Oak Brook, Ill., on Thursday advocating a $15 hourly wage. “We believe we pay fair and competitive wages,” CEO Don Thompson said.

OAK BROOK, Ill. — McDonald's CEO Don Thompson sought to address a growing chorus of critics on issues including worker pay and marketing to children at its annual meeting Thursday.

As hundreds of protesters chanted for higher wages outside, Thompson told the audience in the building that the company has a heritage of providing job opportunities that lead to "real careers."

"We believe we pay fair and competitive wages," Thompson said.

A day earlier, McDonald's closed one of its buildings in suburban Chicago, where protesters had planned to demonstrate over the low wages paid to its workers. Organizers then targeted another site on the company's headquarters, and police say 138 were arrested after they peacefully refused to leave the property.

As in years past, McDonald's marketing tactics to children was also brought up by speakers affiliated with Corporate Accountability International. One mother from Lexington, Ky., Casey Hinds, said Ronald McDonald was "the Joe Camel of fast food."

Thompson said McDonald's wasn't predatory and that Ronald McDonald was about letting kids have fun. He noted that his children ate the chain's food and turned out "quite healthy," with his daughter even becoming a track star.

"We are people. We do have values at McDonald's. We are parents," he said.

Although many fast-food chains engage in similar practices, McDonald's is a frequent target for critics because of its high profile. The criticism is becoming a more pressing issue for the world's biggest hamburger chain at a time when it is fighting to boost weak sales amid heightened competition.

Part of the problem is that people are shifting toward foods they feel are fresher or healthier, which has prompted McDonald's executives in recent months to underscore the quality of the chain's ingredients.

Still, the issue of worker pay has put McDonald's in an uncomfortable spotlight since late 2012, when protests for a $15-an-hour wage began in New York City. Demonstrators were out again before the meeting, chanting, "I want, I want, I want my $15."

McDonald's workers protest wages at annual meeting 05/22/14 [Last modified: Thursday, May 22, 2014 7:30pm]
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