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On to the next one, quickly

Searching for your next job means thinking and working fast. Dawdlers need not apply. Sanjay Sathe, chief executive officer of outplacement company RiseSmart, says a focused plan can save valuable time and produce results. "The single most important thing is to get to that next job fast," Sathe said. "Everybody gets so busy with the process rather than focusing on the results." Sathe offered four steps toward job-seeking success:

Don't spend too much time on job sites. Surfing sites wastes time, Sathe said. Instead, be specific when you browse by identifying key words and phrases that relate to your industry or career field. This focuses your search and saves time.

"It's very important to get to the job you want," Sathe said.

Sharpen your resume. "You really need to spend a lot of time on your resume. You can't take it for granted," Sathe said. "Resumes should be accomplishment-based. What have you done?"

Polish your pitch. "How in a clear, succinct way can you get across what you're made of?" Sathe asked. "It's all about what you can offer" an employer. Devise and rehearse the message you will present to employers.

Use social media and other technology. As employers are using it, job seekers must embrace it, Sathe said. LinkedIn, Facebook and other sites help get your brand and skills out in front of potential employers.

"It's a two-way street on social media. Employers are trying to meet (candidates) through social media. Make sure you're able to reach out to them on social media," Sathe said. "A lot of it is positioning. You can package everything together — put your portfolio online, your contact information. It's a great way of presenting yourself."

On to the next one, quickly 10/16/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 4:30am]
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