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Promotions: the good and the bad

Newly promoted employees may be at a higher risk of job loss, particularly if they were promoted to replace others who were let go during cutbacks, according to OI Partners, a global career transition and coaching firm. The firm surveyed more than 100 executive coaches on employee failure rates and the top reasons workers do not survive a promotion. Many employees who advance to a higher position do not receive proper coaching and training, and their failures could end up hurting a company's bottom line, said the firm's chairman, Tim Schoonover. "Some newly promoted employees have been unable to make the transition from being individual performers to managers," Schoonover said. Associated Press

New managers face challenges

OI Partners lists these common problems for those who have recently acquired a higher position, but do not know how to progress from being individual performers to managing others:

• They may be unable to motivate others and keep them fully engaged in their jobs.

• There's a chance they have a poor ability to relate interpersonally with others. They may have such toxic management behaviors as being too critical, abrasive, unpredictable, self-centered, arrogant, close-minded or volatile.

• Lacking strong written or verbal communication skills can hinder someone's ability to manage effectively.

• They don't enlist the support of subordinates and peers to build commitment to their strategies. Relationships with higher management, colleagues, and other departments are also important factors to managing a team.

• They fail to recognize contributions. Managers need to acknowledge the achievements of others and share their successes.

• They are unsure of what their bosses expect them to accomplish, or the most important company goals.

• It may be impossible to achieve desired results within an acceptable time frame once they've started a new position. The deadline may be as short as three to six months — if it's even clear what the deadline is.

Promotions: the good and the bad 11/24/09 [Last modified: Tuesday, November 24, 2009 6:56am]
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