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Study: Florida most friendly state for retired veterans

Veterans watch the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during training camp in 2016. Florida is the most friendly state for retired veterans according to a new WalletHub study. | LOREN ELLIOTT, Times

Veterans watch the Tampa Bay Buccaneers during training camp in 2016. Florida is the most friendly state for retired veterans according to a new WalletHub study. | LOREN ELLIOTT, Times

Florida is the nation's best state for military retirees looking for somewhere to settle. That's according to a study released Monday by WalletHub which rated Florida the most friendly when it comes to economic factors, quality of life and health care.

"Many of those who reenter the job market face tough challenges during the transition while others struggle with more difficult problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, disability and homelessness," the study said. The Sunshine State, then, is best equipped to help retirees handle such issues, followed by Montana and New Hampshire.

Florida ranked second in terms of quality of life, fourth for health care services and eighth for economic environment. It also has the fifth-highest number of Veterans Affairs health facilities per veteran.

Study: Florida most friendly state for retired veterans 05/22/17 [Last modified: Monday, May 22, 2017 11:28am]
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