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Survey looks at best and worst colors to wear in job interview

Dressing well is critical to making a good first impression on a potential employer, but what do the colors you wear say about you? A survey from CareerBuilder takes a look at the attributes employers most often associate with colors candidates wear to job interviews.

When asked to advise job seekers on the best color to wear to a job interview, employers most often recommended blue (23 percent) and black (15 percent). Orange topped the list for the worst color (25 percent of employers) and was the color most likely to be associated with someone who is unprofessional.

Many employers felt more conservative colors such as black, blue, gray and brown conveyed a sense of professionalism. Other key attributes they pointed to:

Black: Leadership

Blue: Team player

Gray: Logical/analytical

White: Organized

Brown: Dependable

Red: Power

Green, yellow, orange or purple: All four colors were associated with creative.

Dress for success

CareerBuilder experts offer the following tips to dress for success when meeting with a potential employer:

Dress for the environment, but don't get too casual. If everyone is dressed in shorts and flip-flops and you show up in a business suit, you may not come across as the right fit. Dress according to the environment, but always look polished. Wear a suit where appropriate or at the very least a nice pair of pants or skirt and collared shirt or blouse.

Stick with neutrals. You can't go wrong with navy, black, brown and gray. You can pair this with a classic white button-down shirt or incorporate a splash of a more vibrant color.

Tailor your outfit. Clothing that is too tight or revealing can leave an unfavorable impression. Clothing that is too loose can make you look like a kid wearing your dad's suit. Make sure your interview apparel complements your shape.

Don't distract the interviewer. Wacky ties, loud patterns and oversized jewelry can cause the interviewer to spend more time wondering about your outfit than your skill set. Solids or small patterns are your best bet for interview attire.

Pay attention to details. Make sure shoes are polished, clothes are wrinkle-free and nails are manicured. Be mindful of your choice of belt, tie clip, hosiery, socks, etc.

Survey looks at best and worst colors to wear in job interview 11/29/13 [Last modified: Friday, November 29, 2013 6:04pm]
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