Make us your home page
Instagram

The Think System: How to quit your job

It's the day you've been waiting for — the day you quit the job you hate. You may be tempted to put into play that quitting fantasy you've been perfecting, but don't. Stephen Viscusi, the author of On the Job: How to Make It in the Real World of Work, says how you resign will invariably influence your career in the future. Don't get mad. Don't get even. Just get out with your hard-earned professionalism still intact. Here's how:

Think long-term: Don't burn bridges. While trashing your boss or coworkers may feel gratifying at the moment, once you speak the incriminating words, you can never take them back — people will always remember them. Not only do you need your former employer as a reference, but it is very possible you will run into someone connected with your old job in the future. One caveat: If you have a formal exit interview, you can share appropriate grievances with HR. "Make sure the interview is truly formal in nature," Viscusi says.

Think rationally: Leaving a job can be an emotional experience for you and your boss. When you tell your supervisor you're quitting, you are essentially stating that you are firing him as your boss. He may feel shocked, angry or defensive. He may have to answer to a superior about why you decided to leave. Don't get into an emotional interchange with your boss. Although tensions may rise, remain professional. By quitting, you've already gotten your revenge. Your boss will have to fill your position, train the new hire and wait for him or her to overcome any learning curve before being truly productive.

Think ahead: Keep your resignation letter short and to the point and provide the effective date of your resignation. Don't send it by email. Hand in the letter to your boss while you state you are resigning. Be aware that once you give your resignation, it's possible you may be immediately asked to clean out your desk before you're escorted out. Be sure you have already collected the things you really need the week before you resign, such as email addresses, contact information, information about your projects, etc. Once you've left the premises, consider all of this information inaccessible.

Think positive: If your job was truly a horrifying experience, it can be hard to let it go. But bringing your old baggage to a new job is a surefire way to start building an unflattering reputation. Your new boss and coworkers don't want to hear complaints about your old job. Griping makes you look bad, not your employer. Besides, you have reason to celebrate. You have a new job.

© 2013 — Monster Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved. You may not copy, reproduce or distribute this article without the prior written permission of Monster Worldwide. This article first appeared on Monster.com. To see other career-related articles, visit career-advice.monster.com.

The Think System: How to quit your job 05/18/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 6:26pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa man pleads guilty to forging check for fake investment

    Personal Finance

    A Tampa resident was convicted Thursday for forging a check for a fake investment. The Florida Office of Financial Regulation said that Eric Franz Peer pleaded guilty. He served 11 months in jail and will have to pay $18,000.

  2. Minority business accelerator launch by Tampa chamber to aid black, Hispanic businesses

    Business

    A "minority business accelerator" program was launched Thursday by the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce geared toward helping black and Hispanic business owners identify and overcome barriers to grow their companies. The accelerator, known as MBA, will provide participants with business tools to cultivate opportunities …

    Bemetra Simmons is a senior private banker at Wells Fargo, The Private Bank. She is also chair of the new minority business accelerator program for the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce. [Photo, LinkedIn]
  3. Terrier Tri brings unique triathlon training to South Tampa

    Business

    Over a decade ago, Robert Pennino traded late nights in the music studio for early mornings in the Terrier Tri cycle studio.

    Terrier Tri, a cycling studio in South Tampa celebrates a grand opening on June 27. Photo courtesy of Tess Hipp.
  4. New bistro hopes to serve as 'adult Chuck E. Cheese'

    Business

    YBOR CITY — Inside Cheezy's Bistro and Speakeasy, a new restaurant opening in Ybor City, customers will find a mix of family recipes, games and secrecy.

    Cheezy's Bistro and Speakeasy readies to open in Ybor City. Photo courtesy of Cheezy's Bistro and Speakeasy.
  5. Ramadan having an economic impact on local charities, businesses

    Economic Development

    TAMPA — Dodging the rain, a few families and customers gathered inside Petra Restaurant on Busch Boulevard. Around 8:30 p.m., the adham (or call to prayer) music begins, signaling Iftar, the end of the daily fast. Customers grabbed a plate to dig into the feast.

    Baha Abdullah, 35, the owner of the Sultan Market makes kataif, a common dessert that is eaten during the month long celebration of Ramadan in Tampa. [OCTAVIO JONES   |   Times]