Make us your home page
Instagram

Ways to fight perception of being overqualified — if you get the chance

"I wasn't aware this company wanted to hire underqualified people." Have to love that snarky response. It's what one long-term job hunter — sick of hearing that he was overqualified for a job — wished he'd said. Of course, it's better to use discretion, no matter how many times one hears that culling comment from hirers. Culling? You bet. Calling a candidate "overqualified" is a facile way to pare the candidate list. It's also the easy way to avoid giving the real reason for rejection.

Using the "overqualified" dodge may mean:

"We're looking for younger workers."

"You earned too much more in your last job to be happy with this pay."

"You wouldn't like working for a boss with less experience than you."

"You'd become bored and have a bad attitude."

"We think you'd leave as soon as you found something better."

Yep. "Overqualified" can be code for something presumptive, if not discriminatory.

Job hunters repeatedly tell me they'd like to be able to counter those assumptions. Unfortunately, they're usually weeded out of the candidate pool before they have a chance.

If you're in that position and have the opportunity to respond, here are some points to make:

• My skills and experience make me the most-qualified person to meet your needs.

• It is not as important at this point in my work life that I earn as much as I did before. My needs have changed, and I've never measured self-worth by the size of a paycheck.

• I've been able to find satisfaction in every job I've held, as long as I'm making a valued contribution.

• I haven't been a job hopper, and I don't intend to start now.

• I've fully researched the duties and expectations for this job, and I believe I'm a great fit.

If you think age is the barrier, you could consider including only the past 10 to 15 years of work on your resume and removing big titles and graduation dates to raise the chances of reaching an interview.

Ways to fight perception of being overqualified — if you get the chance 10/23/11 [Last modified: Sunday, October 23, 2011 4:30am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Tribune News Service.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa is 15th-most popular city to move to with U-Haul

    Markets

    TAMPA —Tampa is undoubtedly a destination point, at least according to U-Haul.

    Tampa is the No. 15 destination for people moving with U-Haul trucks. | Times file photo
  2. Florida's economy growing faster than other big states and far better than U.S. overall

    Business

    When it comes to economic growth, Florida's running alongside the leading states and well ahead of the United States as a whole.

  3. Westshore Marina District project takes shape with another acquisition

    Real Estate

    TAMPA — One of Tampa Bay's prime waterfront areas took another major step toward redevelopment Friday as WCI Communities bought 2.35 acres in Westshore Marina District.

    WCI Communities, Lennar's high-end subsidiary,has paid $2.5 million for 2.35 acres in the Westshore Marina District for 35 townhomes. WCI is under contract  to buy an additional 9.5 acres.
[BTI Partners]
  4. Posh Guy Harvey RV park to open in Tampa Bay with $250,000 cottages

    Business

    HOLIDAY — Love those Guy Harvey T-shirts with the soaring marlins? In the not too distant future, you might be able to kick back in your own Guy Harvey cottage in the first-ever Guy Harvey RV park.

    Renderings of the clubhouse and an RV cottage site of the planned Guy Harvey Outpost Club & Resort Tarpon Springs.
[Guy Harvey Outpost Collection]
  5. Port Tampa Bay secures $9 million grant to deepen Big Bend Channel

    Business

    Port Tampa Bay has secured a $9 million grant from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the widening and deepening of the Big Bend Channel in southern Hillsborough County.