Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Bankruptcy lawyer seeks okay to auction Casey Anthony's tale

Casey Anthony leaves a federal courthouse in Tampa in March after a bankruptcy hearing.

Associated Press

Casey Anthony leaves a federal courthouse in Tampa in March after a bankruptcy hearing.

TAMPA — How much is Casey Anthony's story worth — even if she doesn't tell it?

It's up to a federal bankruptcy judge in Tampa to decide Tuesday whether we'll ever find out.

The trustee overseeing Anthony's bankruptcy wants to sell the rights to her story to pay debts. One person already has offered $10,000 in hopes of preventing her from profiting off it, a court filing says.

In a motion last month, an attorney asked U.S. Bankruptcy Judge K. Rodney May for permission to sell "the exclusive worldwide rights in perpetuity to the commercialization of Anthony's life story" including her daughter's death and her high-profile murder trial.

The motion said the trustee anticipated other offers besides the one already received. The winning bid would go toward paying Anthony's debts.

But the attorney said he would warn any interested parties that "such higher bid is not contingent upon Ms. Anthony's cooperation."

Anthony's bankruptcy filing did not list her life story as an asset, but many have speculated since her criminal trial that it's probably the only substantial one she has.

Anthony says she's been unemployed since her acquittal in 2011. She has been living off the charity of friends and her lawyers, she said earlier at a hearing in Tampa.

Her bankruptcy attorneys planned to argue Tuesday that the judge should not allow any bidding for her story to occur.

The life story in question doesn't even exist, they argue in a court motion.

"This sets up a terrifying Orwellian prospect that would destroy the long-standing protections guaranteed by the Bankruptcy Code and the Fifth, Thirteen, and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution," the motion says.

Anthony filed bankruptcy in January, listing more than $792,000 in debt. Her largest creditor was her criminal attorney Jose Baez, whom she said she owed $500,000. She declared less than $1,100 in assets.

The hearing on the sale of her life story was scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Bankruptcy lawyer seeks okay to auction Casey Anthony's tale 04/09/13 [Last modified: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 5:02pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Support for gay marriage surges, even among groups once wary

    Nation

    NEW YORK — In the two years since same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide, support for it has surged even among groups that recently were broadly opposed, according to a new national survey.

    People gather in Washington's Lafayette Park to see the White House lit up in rainbow colors on June 26, 2015, the day the Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage legal. In the two years since same-sex marriage was legalized nationwide, support for it has surged even among groups that recently were broadly opposed, according to a new national survey released on Monday, June 26, 2017. [Associated Press]
  2. June 26 marks the 20th anniversary of the Harry Potter series.
  3. Air bag recalls, lawsuits lead Takata to file for bankruptcy

    Autos

    Shattered by recall costs and lawsuits, Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. filed Monday for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., saying it was the only way it could keep on supplying replacements for faulty air bag inflators linked to the deaths of at least 16 people.

    Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. CEO Shigehisa Takada bows during a press conference in Tokyo on Monday. Takata has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of defective air bag inflators.
[(AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi]
  4. Philando Castile family reaches $3 million settlement in death

    Crime

    MINNEAPOLIS — The mother of Philando Castile, a black motorist killed by a Minnesota police officer last year, has reached a nearly $3 million settlement in his death, according to an announcement Monday by her attorneys and the Minneapolis suburb that employed the officer.

    A handout dashboard camera image of Officer Jeronimo Yanez firing at Philando Castile during a traffic stop in Falcon Heights, Minn., July 6, 2016. [Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension via The New York Times]
  5. From the food editor: Almond-Crusted Chicken Tenders

    Cooking

    I decided my almond chicken obsession was becoming a bit much.

    Almond Crusted Chicken Tenders. Photo by Michelle Stark, Times food editor.