Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Gibsonton HOA accused of violating Fair Housing Act

RIVERVIEW — A Gibsonton homeowners association and its former property manager are charged with violating the federal Fair Housing Act after they threatened to evict a family of eight because there were too many people living in the house, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

In 2006, the Townhomes of Kings Lake Homeowners Association and the Vanguard Management Group informed renters Kim Konash and her husband they were not in compliance with the neighborhood's occupancy policy, according to a federal document detailing the charge.

The policy restricted the number of people living in a four-bedroom household to six.

With six children, the couple was told to move out or face eviction in 30 days, the document says.

The Fair Housing Act makes it unlawful to discriminate against renters on the basis of age, sex, color, disability, national origin, religion or family status, according to HUD.

A HUD investigation found that Hillsborough County homes of a similar size are allowed by ordinance to have up to 11 occupants.

Being overly restrictive on the number of people allowed in a household discriminates against large families, said HUD spokeswoman Shantae Goodloe.

If a federal judge finds discrimination did occur, the homeowners association and the Vanguard Management Group could face up to $16,000 in fines plus damages, Goodloe said.

When reached Tuesday, Janet Moyer, the CEO of Vanguard, declined to comment.

A representative for the homeowners association could not be reached.

Konash said the threat of eviction did not materialize until the family had lived in the home for months.

The trouble began, she said, after the family received a complaint from the homeowners association about the unruly behavior of their children.

According to the federal document, the homeowners association was unable to substantiate those assertions.

"Then shortly after that, we got a notice that we were in violation of HOA rules that limited the number of people," she said. "That's discriminatory."

Konash, who now has seven children and is divorced, said she has not had custody of her six youngest children for the past two years due to a separate incident involving the Department of Children and Families.

While the HUD investigation was under way, the homeowners association agreed not to evict the family.

The family stayed through the end of the one-year lease before moving.

According to the federal document, the homeowners association published a neighborhood newsletter in 2010 reaffirming the same occupancy restricting policy was still in place.

Shelley Rossetter can be reached at srossetter@tampabay.com or (813) 661-2442.

Gibsonton HOA accused of violating Fair Housing Act 09/04/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 11:31pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Necropsy confirms drowning as Snooty the manatee's cause of death

    Human Interest

    BRADENTON— The South Florida museum aquarium will re-open Tuesday and grief counselors will be available after the untimely death of beloved manatee Snooty.

    Snooty, the Manatee County mascot, turned 60 in 2008. Hundreds of people came to the Parker Manatee Aquarium to see Snooty at his birthday party. He was the first manatee to have a recorded birth date on July 21, 1948.

 [Times (2008)]
  2. Charlie Gard's parents withdraw legal action over their sick baby

    World

    LONDON — The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard dropped their legal bid Monday to send him to the United States for experimental treatment after new medical tests showed it could no longer help.

    Chris Gard and Connie Yates, the parents of critically ill infant Charlie Gard, arrive at the Royal Courts of Justice in London ahead of the latest High Court hearing in London Monday July 24, 2017. They  returned  to the court for the latest stage in their effort to seek permission to take the child to the United States for medical treatment. Britain's High Court is considering new evidence in the case of Charlie Gard. The 11-month-old has a rare genetic condition, and his parents want to take him to America to receive an experimental treatment. [Jonathan Brady | PA via AP]
  3. Restaurant review: Food and beer pair nicely at the Eatery at Brew Bus Terminal and Brewery

    Food & Dining

    TAMPA - Tampa Bay's craft beer scene is perennially in flux. New breweries open, others close or get scooped up by bigger breweries, some reinvent themselves so they can sell beer off site, and still others build on kitchens and add food to give enthusiasts another reason to sit tight.

    A Passion of the Heights hibiscus wheat ale is displayed at The Brew Bus in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, Jul 19, 2017.  The Brew Bus Terminal, which houses a microbrewery and tasting room and serves as a hub for bus tours to local breweries, has opened an on-site kitchen called the Eatery. With the opening of the new casual dining concept, the brewery joins the ranks of microbreweries across the country that have asked that question: "What goes with beer? Hey, how about food?"
  4. For starters: Rays vs. Orioles, seeking to halt a skid

    Blogs

    After being swept by the Rangers, and losing four straight, the Rays are looking to get back on track tonight against the Orioles, and they have LHP Blake Snell on the mound.

     Blake Snell will be on the mound tonight.
  5. This 'SNL' writer is cracking up Twitter with his replies to President Donald Trump's tweets

    National

    Josh Patten is a writer for Saturday Night Live. Earlier this month, he began responding to President Donald Trump's tweets as if they were private texts to Patten.