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Lawyer plans to put Casey Anthony under oath in Tampa

Casey Anthony initially said a nanny named Zenaida Fernandez-Gonzalez kidnapped her daughter. Investigators later determined that the baby sitter was fictitious, and now a real woman named Zenaida Gonzalez is suing Anthony for defamation.

JOE BURBANK | Orlando Sentinel (2011)

Casey Anthony initially said a nanny named Zenaida Fernandez-Gonzalez kidnapped her daughter. Investigators later determined that the baby sitter was fictitious, and now a real woman named Zenaida Gonzalez is suing Anthony for defamation.

In less than a month, Casey Anthony will be forced to answer questions that have been a mystery since her daughter went missing in 2008, a lawyer involved in a lawsuit against her said Thursday.

"Casey Anthony will not be permitted to plead the Fifth, as her appeals have now been resolved," said Matt Morgan, the attorney for Zenaida Gonzalez, who has filed a defamation suit against Anthony. "We look forward to getting answers to the questions we have had for a very long time."

The deposition of Anthony is scheduled for Oct. 9 in Tampa.

Anthony told detectives in 2008 that her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee, was kidnapped by a baby sitter named Zenaida Fernandez-Gonzalez.

But detectives said no such nanny existed. The girl's body was found in December 2008. Anthony was found not guilty of her death in 2011.

Anthony has never been required to answer questions about her daughter's disappearance under oath in court, and Morgan said he does not foresee any obstacles standing in the way of her deposition next month.

Charles Green, Anthony's attorney, was not available for comment Thursday.

News of the Oct. 9 deposition marks the latest milestone in Anthony's ongoing legal issues.

A federal judge last month approved a deal struck between Anthony and her bankruptcy trustee to avoid selling rights to her life story to pay back debtors.

In a joint filing last month, Anthony agreed to pay $25,000 to settle the dispute over whether the rights to her story would be sold as an asset in her Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Anthony's bankruptcy filing did not list her story as an asset, but many have speculated it is the only one she has.

Lawyer plans to put Casey Anthony under oath in Tampa 09/12/13 [Last modified: Thursday, September 12, 2013 8:58pm]
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