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Attorney: Man who posed as 14-year-old needs mental health treatment

TAMPA — Julious Threatts has a serious but temporary mental health problem and needs to go to a special treatment program in Pasco County, his attorney told a judge Tuesday.

To allow Threatts to apply for the program, Circuit Judge Daniel Perry postponed sentencing for the 21-year-old who posed as a 14-year-old to join a peewee football team.

Deputies say Threatts used the alias Chad Jordan to join the Tampa Bay Youth Football League and to try to register at Webb Middle School.

His diagnosis was not discussed in court, but Threatts' mental health liaison said he found a facility in Pasco that could treat him — a residential home run by Gulf Coast Community Care.

It's a voluntary mental health program geared toward helping people with serious, persistent mental health problems function in society, according to clinical director Daniel DeFrank.

In court Tuesday, Perry asked how Threatts had obtained the fake birth certificate he used to get on the team. He got it on the Internet, public defender Catherine E. Orazi replied.

Perry also reviewed an investigative file on Threatts. At a hearing last week, a prosecutor alluded to an ongoing investigation, but, like last week, the details were not discussed in court. The prosecutor simply told Perry that it was a felony investigation and it had been closed.

When Threatts was arrested on Aug. 24, he was also accused of having sex with a 14-year-old girl, according to Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Debbie Carter. Deputies spoke to the girl, who said the two had just kissed.

Charges will not be filed, and that investigation is closed, Carter said.

Sentencing for charges of trespassing on school grounds, obstruction by a disguised person and violation of probation is scheduled for Nov. 3.

Jessica Vander Velde can be reached at jvandervelde@sptimes.com or (813) 226-3433.

Attorney: Man who posed as 14-year-old needs mental health treatment 10/12/10 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 11:34pm]
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