Florida Supreme Court denies new DNA analysis in death row inmate William 'Tommy' Zeigler's case

William Thomas Zeigler, 71, who has spent the last 40 years on death row for the murders of four people, will not be allowed to test evidence in his case with touch DNA technology, the Florida Supreme Court ruled Friday. Zeigler was convicted of killing his wife, her parents and another man at his Winter Garden furniture store on Dec. 24, 1975. [Courtesy of Florida Department of Corrections]
William Thomas Zeigler, 71, who has spent the last 40 years on death row for the murders of four people, will not be allowed to test evidence in his case with touch DNA technology, the Florida Supreme Court ruled Friday. Zeigler was convicted of killing his wife, her parents and another man at his Winter Garden furniture store on Dec. 24, 1975. [Courtesy of Florida Department of Corrections]
Published April 22 2017
Updated April 22 2017

William "Tommy" Zeigler, the 71-year-old man who has spent the last four decades on death row for the murders of four people, will not be allowed to test evidence in his case with touch DNA technology, the Florida Supreme Court ruled Friday.

Zeigler was convicted of killing his wife, her parents and another man at his Winter Garden furniture store on Dec. 24, 1975. The case has long attracted those skeptical of the evidence against Zeigler, including one of the original investigators and a former Orlando Sentinel newspaper editor. It was also the subject of a 1992 book called Fatal Flaw.

In 2015, his attorneys filed a motion seeking court approval to use a special DNA test to examine evidence, such as clothing and the guns found at the scene, presented at the trial. A circuit court denied the motion, and his attorneys appealed to the state's highest court. While Zeigler sits on death row awaiting an execution date, he is also sentenced to serve the rest of his life in prison.

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