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Sergio the duck is a real-life lesson for Melbourne sixth-graders

MELBOURNE — During a recent fire drill at Suntree Elementary, Jana Gabrielski watched one member of her class lose his cool. The siren's screech panicked him as he bolted to the exit.

Yeah, it probably wasn't the smoothest move. But cut Sergio some slack. After all, he's only 3 months old.

And a duck.

"That alarm went off, and he was terrified," Gabrielski recalled of the 7-pound, ivory-hued quacker. "He just took off after us, racing us to the door.

The incredibly social American Pekin duck's reaction had students and staff in stitches as they waited out the drill on the Melbourne campus, she said. "He was out waddling out in the field (during) the fire drill," Gabrielski said of Sergio's back-and-forth pacing. "It was hysterical."

When you're raising a duck on school grounds, fun little moments like this become the norm. And they offer learning opportunities that no written curriculum can match, staffers say.

Sergio was born in Gabriel­ski's sixth-grade classroom Feb. 24, the only duck egg of more than 30 that students had attempted to hatch this year. The project is a spinoff from a yearly chicken egg incubation. When all the other eggs rotted, hopes weren't high a duck was going to surface.

And then, a tiny Sergio hatched.

"Little ducks are the cutest thing," Gabrielski said, noting the original plan was to have someone on a farm adopt him. "He was just adorable. We decided to keep him a little longer because he was so cute."

That soft deadline kept getting extended. And now, it has been decided. Young Sergio will stay at Suntree.

"This is authentic education," the sixth-grade teacher explained. "It's not textbook, it's not FSA (the Florida Standards Assessment method of testing). It's just learning."

Just ask the sixth-graders who have been caring for him since day one. On Thursday, a group hurriedly began spouting out duck facts to a reporter as others lovingly catered to the critter.

Sixth-graders have built indoor and outdoor accommodations for the duck. The "Sergio Squad" comes in a half-hour early every day to give him fresh water and food, clean out his pens and do whatever else a duckling might need. They even built the pens themselves, learning from their wood-measuring mistakes.

"They're amazing," Gabrielski said of her students taking full responsibility for their feathered friend. "I don't do anything."

Sergio will be fostered over the summer break and return to school in August. Some fifth-graders were trained this year to help care for him in the fall.

But fans can keep up with him this summer via his Instagram handle @sergio—the—duck.

Principal Mecheall Giombetti said it has been an enjoyable, real-life connection for the 663 students on campus.

"It's an opportunity for problem solving," Giombetti said. "As you take on something like this, you don't always know what to expect, because you're constantly looking at the situation and resolving issues and making it work."

Last week, Sergio, wearing a bow tie and diaper, walked — er, waddled — alongside graduating sixth graders at the school's commencement ceremony.

"He was the star of our class. Every year at the graduation ceremony, we show a slideshow of what students said their best memory was from school," Gabrielski said.

"Of course, for so many of them, it was Sergio."

Sergio the duck is a real-life lesson for Melbourne sixth-graders 05/29/16 [Last modified: Sunday, May 29, 2016 8:37pm]
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