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FAMU hiring new director for Marching 100

TALLAHASSEE — Florida A&M University announced it is hiring a new director for its famous Marching 100 band, a major step to eventually relaunching the band that was sidelined by a 2011 hazing scandal.

Sylvester Young, a FAMU alumnus and one-time director of the Ohio University marching band, is coming out of retirement to rebuild the Marching 100.

The band known for its marching appearances at presidential inaugurations and Super Bowls has been suspended since the November 2011 hazing-related death of drum major Robert Champion.

Larry Robinson, interim president for FAMU, said Tuesday that he tapped Young for the job of rebuilding the band because he has the experience and strong discipline to help the school decide when it's right for the Marching 100 to take the field anew.

Robinson could not say exactly when that might be, although he called the hiring of the 66-year-old Young a "critical" step. He did not rule out a return this fall. But he suggested that the band may come back initially as a smaller unit and play in the stands instead of performing one of its signature halftime shows.

"There's a number of ways you could get to the fall without what we are accustomed to," Robinson said.

Young said he doesn't want to rush the band back on field, saying he will first ensure the "culture" of the band has changed.

Young, who had marched at FAMU back in the '60s when it was led by Marching 100 founder William P. Foster, acknowledged that hazing likely occurred when he was at school. He said Champion's death has opened the eyes of many band directors nationwide about the need to crack down on hazing.

"Other schools are watching us very closely," said Young, who spent 21 years at Ohio University.

FAMU hiring new director for Marching 100 05/08/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 11:19pm]
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