Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

School meals

Breakfast served at these Pinellas schools

Breakfast

Breakfast is served at all elementary schools and the following other schools and centers:

Azalea Middle
Bayside High
Boca Ciega High
Calvin Hunsinger School
Clearwater Intermediate
Clearwater High
Coachman Fundamental
Countryside High
Dixie Hollins High
East Lake High
Fitzgerald Middle
Gibbs High
Hamilton Disston School
Kennedy Middle
Lakewood High
Largo High
Lealman Intermediate
John Hopkins Middle
Madeira Beach Middle
Meadowlawn Middle
Nina Harris School
North Ward Secondary
Northeast High
Oak Grove Middle
Osceola High
Palm Harbor Middle
Palm Harbor University High
Paul B. Stephens School
Pinellas Park High
Pinellas Park Middle
PTEC-Clearwater
PTEC-St. Petersburg
Richard L. Sanders School
Seminole High
St. Petersburg High
Tarpon Springs High
Tarpon Springs Middle
Thurgood Marshall Fundamental Middle
Tyrone Middle
Breakfast

Breakfast is served at all elementary schools and the following other schools and centers:

Azalea Middle
Bayside High
Boca Ciega High
Calvin Hunsinger School
Clearwater Intermediate
Clearwater High
Coachman Fundamental
Countryside High
Dixie Hollins High
East Lake High
Fitzgerald Middle
Gibbs High
Hamilton Disston School
Kennedy Middle
Lakewood High
Largo High
Lealman Intermediate
John Hopkins Middle
Madeira Beach Middle
Meadowlawn Middle
Nina Harris School
North Ward Secondary
Northeast High
Oak Grove Middle
Osceola High
Palm Harbor Middle
Palm Harbor University High
Paul B. Stephens School
Pinellas Park High
Pinellas Park Middle
PTEC-Clearwater
PTEC-St. Petersburg
Richard L. Sanders School
Seminole High
St. Petersburg High
Tarpon Springs High
Tarpon Springs Middle
Thurgood Marshall Fundamental Middle
Tyrone Middle


Income limits for reduced-price meals
#* Annual Monthly Weekly
1 $18,889 $1,575 $364
2 25,327 2,111 488
3 31,765 2,648 611
4 38,203 3,184 735
5 44,641 3,721 859
6 51,079 4,257 983
7 57,517 4,794 1,107
8 63,955 5,330 1,230
** 6,438 537 124
* Number of people in household

** Added income allowed for each additional family member.

Income limits for free meals
# Annual Monthly Weekly
1 $13,273 $1,107 $256
2 17,797 1,484 343
3 22,321 1,861 430
4 26,845 2,238 517
5 31,369 2,615 604
6 35,893 2,992 691
7 40,417 3,369 778
8 44,941 3,746 865
* 4,524 377 87
* Added income allowed for each additional family member.
Income limits for reduced-price meals
#* Annual Monthly Weekly
1 $18,889 $1,575 $364
2 25,327 2,111 488
3 31,765 2,648 611
4 38,203 3,184 735
5 44,641 3,721 859
6 51,079 4,257 983
7 57,517 4,794 1,107
8 63,955 5,330 1,230
** 6,438 537 124
* Number of people in household

** Added income allowed for each additional family member.

Income limits for free meals
# Annual Monthly Weekly
1 $13,273 $1,107 $256
2 17,797 1,484 343
3 22,321 1,861 430
4 26,845 2,238 517
5 31,369 2,615 604
6 35,893 2,992 691
7 40,417 3,369 778
8 44,941 3,746 865
* 4,524 377 87
* Added income allowed for each additional family member.


Cost

Breakfast prices are $1 for elementary students, $1.25 for middle and high school, and $1.75 for adults.

All reduced-price breakfasts are 30 cents.

Lunch prices are $1.75 for elementary students, $2 for middle and high schools, and $2.75 for adults.

All reduced-price lunches are 40 cents.

Students who qualify for free lunch also may receive free breakfast.

This chart gives income eligibility guidelines for free and reduced-price breakfast and lunch. For information, contact the food services department at 547-7155.

Income limits
Reduced-price meals
Household sizeAnnualMonthlyWeekly
119,2401,604370
225,9002,159499
332,5602,714627
439,2203,269755
545,8803,824883
652,5404,3791,011
759,2004,9341,139
865,8605,4891,267
Plus*6,660555129
Free meals
Household sizeAnnualMonthlyWeekly
113,5201,127260
218,2001,517350
322,8801,907440
427,5602,297530
532,2402,687620
636,9203,077710
741,6003,467800
846,2803,857890
Plus*4,68039090
*Added income allowed for each additional family member

Breakfast served at these Pinellas schools 08/02/08 [Last modified: Monday, August 4, 2008 2:23pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Trigaux: For Class of 2016, college debt loads favor Florida graduates

    Banking

    Florida college graduates saddled with student debt: Take heart. The average debt Class of 2016 Florida grads must bear is less than students in most states.

    University of South Florida undergraduates gather at the USF Sun Dome in Tampa for last fall's commencement ceremony. A new survey finds their average student debt upon graduating was $22,276. Statewide, 2016 Florida grads ranked a relatively unencumbered 45th among states, averaging $24,461 in student debt. [Photo Luis Santana | Times]
  2. Romano: One person, one vote is not really accurate when it comes to Florida

    Politics

    Imagine this:

    Your mail-in ballot for the St. Petersburg mayoral election has just arrived. According to the fine print, if you live on the west side of the city, your ballot will count as one vote. Meanwhile, a ballot in St. Pete's northeast section counts for three votes.

    Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections worker Andrea West adds mail ballots to an inserter Sept. 22 at the Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections Service Center in Largo. (SCOTT KEELER   |   Times)
  3. St. Petersburg will hold first budget hearing tonight

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The Sunshine City's new property tax rate looks exactly like its current rate. For the second year in a row, Mayor Rick Kriseman does not plan to ask City Council for a tax hike or a tax cut.

    Mayor Rick Kriseman talks about the state of the city on Tuesday, two days after Hiurricane Irma passed through the state. [EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times]
  4. 'We were lucky': Zephyrhills, Dade City get back to normal after Irma

    Hurricanes

    Two weeks after Hurricane Irma struck Florida, residents and city officials in eastern Pasco — hit harder than other areas of the county — are moving forward to regain normalcy.

    Edward F. Wood, 70, tugs at a branch to unload a pile of debris he and his wife picked up in their neighborhood, Lakeview in the Hills in Dade City.
  5. After Hurricane Irma, many ask: How safe are shelters?

    News

    NAPLES — Residents of the Naples Estates mobile home park beamed and cheered when President Donald Trump and Gov. Rick Scott strolled amid piles of shredded aluminum three days after Hurricane Irma to buck up residents and hail the work of emergency responders. But almost nobody had anything good to say about …

    The Islamic Society of Tampa Bay Area opened its doors to anyone seeking temporary shelter during Hurricane Irma. Evacuees were housed in the Istaba multipurpose building and was quickly at capacity housing over 500 people. [Saturday, September 9, 2017] [Photo Luis Santana | Times]