Common Application makes applying for college easy

By RACHEL LUBITZ

George Washington University

If you're one of those "lucky" kids whose mother has printed out every single application to every single university you are even remotely interested in, and those applications have made a Dr. Seuss-ian stack on your desk that you are afraid to touch, there is a way to say, "Hey Ma, I got this."

The Common Application was created in 1975 as a way to standardize the process of applying to some of the most picky universities, and it has evolved into a university application haven. Sweaty, stressed applicants make an account on commonapp.org and add as many colleges as they want to be sent this one, common application. There's a master application that you fill out with your contact info, extracurricular activities and an essay of your choosing. There is even an area for teachers to upload recommendations.

More than 400 public and private universities and colleges accept the common application, so chances are good that your school is a member of commonapp.org. In some special cases (mostly the schools that are more difficult to get into), there is a supplement that may just ask you to fill out your contact information one more time and produce maybe just one more 500-word essay.

Want to apply to Harvard? You got it (with a supplement). Assumption College? ('cause you were under the assumption that it was in a good area of Massachusetts . . . it's really not.) Go ahead and apply. College of Wooster because it rhymes with rooster? Why not? Applicants have all the Ivies to apply to mindlessly, and even Florida public schools such as New College.

If you've got college ADD, this site will save you tons of time. There's no more going to every single college site and printing out application after application. Commonapp.org has what you need in an easy format. The price varies, but ADDers beware: There is a fee for each application you submit. Some are $30, some are $50, some top $75. It all depends on the university.

So if you're a freaked-out college applicant, commonapp.org will save your sanity. The site can eliminate your fear of failing — because you know what, Harvard hopeful? If you use the Common App, you've got at your fingertips a whole list of other schools that will accept the same application and could surprise you with a thick envelope come December or April.

Rachel Lubitz is a 2010 graduate of Countryside High and a former student editor of tb-two*.

By RACHEL LUBITZ

George Washington University

If you're one of those "lucky" kids whose mother has printed out every single application to every single university you are even remotely interested in, and those applications have made a Dr. Seuss-ian stack on your desk that you are afraid to touch, there is a way to say, "Hey Ma, I got this."

The Common Application was created in 1975 as a way to standardize the process of applying to some of the most picky universities, and it has evolved into a university application haven. Sweaty, stressed applicants make an account on commonapp.org and add as many colleges as they want to be sent this one, common application. There's a master application that you fill out with your contact info, extracurricular activities and an essay of your choosing. There is even an area for teachers to upload recommendations.

More than 400 public and private universities and colleges accept the common application, so chances are good that your school is a member of commonapp.org. In some special cases (mostly the schools that are more difficult to get into), there is a supplement that may just ask you to fill out your contact information one more time and produce maybe just one more 500-word essay.

Want to apply to Harvard? You got it (with a supplement). Assumption College? ('cause you were under the assumption that it was in a good area of Massachusetts … it's really not.) Go ahead and apply. College of Wooster because it rhymes with rooster? Why not? Applicants have all the Ivies to apply to mindlessly, and even Florida public schools such as New College.

If you've got college ADD, this site will save you tons of time. There's no more going to every single college site and printing out application after application. Commonapp.org has what you need in an easy format. The price varies, but ADDers beware: There is a fee for each application you submit. Some are $30, some are $50, some top $75. It all depends on the university.

So if you're a freaked-out college applicant, commonapp.org will save your sanity. The site can eliminate your fear of failing — because you know what, Harvard hopeful? If you use the Common App, you've got at your fingertips a whole list of other schools that will accept the same application and could surprise you with a thick envelope come December or April.

Rachel Lubitz is a 2010 graduate of Countryside High and a former student editor of tb-two*.

Common Application makes applying for college easy 09/18/10 [Last modified: Saturday, September 18, 2010 4:52pm]

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