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Essential information for starting school in Pinellas

Registration

Pinellas County parents can find back-to-school information at pcsb.org. Here are a few highlights for families who are not yet registered:

Getting started

Any new student going into kindergarten, sixth or ninth grade will be assigned to a zoned school. Students must be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1 to register for kindergarten. Students going into other grades will be assigned to their zoned school on a space-available basis.

(Note: Families that do not want a child to attend a zoned school can make a late application to get into a special program such as a magnet or a career academy. The initial application period was in January, but some programs still have room. The district will accept late applications until Dec. 31. To apply, visit reservation.pcsb.org or call the student assignment office at (727) 588-6210.)

Identify your school

To get your child into a zoned school, find the school that corresponds with your address at pcsb.org. The direct link is https://sap.pinellas.k12.fl.us/PubInfony. The next step is to reserve a seat in that school.

Reserve a seat

Before registering for a Pinellas school, families must make a reservation. Use the online tool at reservation.pcsb.org. You will need a user ID and password. To get one, stop in at any Pinellas school and make sure to bring a valid ID such as a driver's license, state ID card, passport or visa, military ID or green card. If you already have a user ID and password for another child, you do not need a new one.

Registering your child

Once you've reserved a seat, the final step is to visit the school to register. But make sure you bring the required documents:

• Birth certificate or other proof of identity and age. Parents who can't locate their child's birth certificate should contact the school for other acceptable documents.

• Two documents proving residency. These can include an electricity, water, cable or land-based telephone bill. A lease, closing document or Pinellas County tax statement with homestead exemption also will do. The documents must be recent and list the parent or guardian's name and address. If none of these documents is in the name of the parent or guardian, parents must complete an affidavit of residency, available at schools or at pcsb.org. The affidavit must be notarized on both sides.

• Child's Social Security number, if the child has one.

• Most recent report card for children entering grades 1-12, if available.

• Florida Certificate of Immunization, appropriate for the grade level.

• Physical exam certificate, signed by a licensed examiner and dated within the past 12 months.

• A recent individualized education plan (IEP), if the student requires exceptional education.

Still have questions? Call the student assignment office at (727) 588-6210 or visit the office at 301 Fourth St. SW in Largo.

Bus routes

Registered students who are eligible for a bus ride will receive a postcard from the district in early August with their bus stop and route for 2014-15. Questions? Contact the district's transportation center at (727) 587-2020.

Back-to-school nights/orientations

Schools will communicate the date for back-to-school events through recorded phone messages, letters sent home, school websites, newsletters and more. Contact the school directly with questions.

Pinellas recommends that schools hold back-to-school events on certain nights. For elementary schools, those evenings are Aug. 14, 19, 28 and Sept. 10 and 17. Middle schools are urged to hold events on Aug. 27 and Sept. 8, and fundamental middle and intermediate schools on Sept. 3 and 16. The designated night for all high schools is Aug. 25.

Essential information for starting school in Pinellas 07/31/14 [Last modified: Thursday, July 31, 2014 7:04pm]
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