Saturday, December 16, 2017
Education

Gulf High senior spotlights great films at Friday Flix

They shuffle in after-hours, ringing the bell and entering through a side door, speak- easy style, following the scent of microwave popcorn through the darkened stacks, up the stairs and down the hall.

There, Katrina Enoch, 17, awaits their arrival outside the makeshift theater with the big pull-down screen.

"Tonight's feature is one I haven't seen before," she tells the dozen or so who have settled into their seats for Friday Flix at the New Port Richey Library.

Then Katrina, donning a signature floral print dress, tells them what she does know about Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Her take is along the lines of Robert Osborne, who is famous for sandwiching interesting and obscure facts between the showing of films on the Turner Classics Movie Channel.

A Space Odyssey was released in 1968, but filming began in 1965. Kubrick had a $10.5 million budget. "Being the '60s that was a lot of money at the time." The stars of the film are unknowns who went on to take smaller roles in television shows such as Gunsmoke and Charlie's Angels. The film is long: 2 hours and 20 minutes. "So don't feel bad if you feel the need to get up and stretch or walk around." And it starts out very dark and there is no dialogue for a while and not much after that, but those who stick with it might enjoy the stellar cinematography.

With that, the lights are dimmed and the movie begins.

Since January, this is how Katrina, a senior in the International Baccalaureate program at Gulf High School, chooses to spend her Friday nights.

A volunteer with the library's Teen Advisory Board, it was her idea to revive the defunct Friday Flix program after discovering a shared passion for film with the library's outreach director, Ann Scott.

"Katrina really had the history of loving films and her taste was quite sophisticated for her age," Scott said. "With Katrina's interest, we decided to give it a try once again."

They rang in 2012 with a series of silent films: City Lights, The Crowd and Metropolis; kicked off February with odd couplings like the dark comedy Harold and Maude; celebrated director Ingmar Bergman's birthday in July with a nod to Swedish cinema. Now, they are a few weeks into a theme on cinematography with flicks like Space Odyssey, Pleasantville and this Friday's feature, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

The selections are a collaboration, Scott said. "I ask her what she's thinking of doing, then we tweak it together. But the majority of work is Katrina's."

The youngest of five, Katrina has long enjoyed the movie experience.

"Both of my parents are into film. We usually watch a movie once a week," she said.

A serious interest was piqued in a maudlin way during the summer before her eighth-grade year, when she became immersed in the Charles Manson murder cases of the late 1960s.

She discovered director Roman Polanski, whose wife, actress Sharon Tate, was murdered by members of the Manson family. "Then I watched one film of his films — Rosemary's Baby. It was clearly well acted and well shot. After that I got into Mia Farrow, who starred in the film. Then that led me to Woody Allen, who featured Mia Farrow in a lot of his films and was inspired by Bergman."

From there, she's made her way through tons of musicals, classics and more. "I love gangster films and the old, smart comedies. I like Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and anything with Judy Garland in it — she could do no wrong. I like pretty much anything that has a smart story line, is well executed and well acted."

During her junior year, Katrina also helped found the Gulf High Film Club at her school, working with her world history teacher, Andrew Madeloni, who sold snacks to raise money for ALS research.

"I modeled it after the library program," Katrina said. "It gets a lot of interest, but it's not as well organized. This year, I hope to be better about that."

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