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1144835 2999-04-26 00:00:00.0 UTC 2999-04-25T20:00:00.000-04:00 2011-01-11 21:56:05.0 UTC 2011-01-11T16:56:05.000-05:00 st-petersburgs-private-wellington-school-to-close-may-26 Published 2011-01-11 21:56:06.0 UTC 2011-01-11T16:56:06.000-05:00 news/education DTI 70683340 After 36 years, the Wellington School, a private, independent school for students from prekindergarten to eighth grade, is closing. With the recession taking its toll on enrollment, it fell to the daughter of founders Andrew and Lorraine Pelosi to announce the decision at the start of the new year. "We have been supplementing the budget, and we just simply cannot afford to do that any longer,'' said Susan Baraybar, the Pelosis' daughter and chief operations manager. Last fall, the school moved all the students at its St. Petersburg campus, at 5175 45th St. N, to its smaller Seminole campus at 8000 Starkey Road, in an effort to balance the budget. The St. Petersburg campus remained open for offices and athletics. The last day for the school, which has 165 students, will be May 26. Wendy Miskewich, whose 8-year-old daughter, Justine, has been a student at Wellington since she was 4, said she is sad. "I am very disappointed, because I thought Justine would be there until the eighth grade. But as disappointed as I am that they are closing, I am confident that Justine will do well because of the strong foundation that was provided for her,'' said Miskewich, a project manager for Hennessy Construction Services. "I have known Susan Baraybar and her mom since before Justine was conceived," she said. "I built their gym at their St. Pete campus. I remember when we had the ground-breaking ceremony. I was so impressed with the students.'' The letter announcing the closing went out Jan. 3. Baraybar said it was timed to give families an opportunity to make other plans, including meeting the deadline for signing up for Pinellas County's fundamental schools. "In looking beyond this year, we must be realistic in considering the challenges we are faced with regarding the continuation of Wellington School,'' the letter said. "As you all know, we downsized to mostly one class per grade level. This was necessary due to space constraints and demand. The result of this condition leaves us vulnerable to attrition issues when students leave our school.'' In her letter, Baraybar blamed the economy for proving "to be a challenge to most independent schools.'' Last year, the 30-year-old Pinellas County Jewish Day School was forced to close. Attempts to start another collapsed. Wellington tried to survive by attempting to become a nonprofit institution, Baraybar said. She said her family planned to donate a large portion of the value of the business and the Seminole property to the new organization, but a newly formed board of directors would have needed to raise additional money to fund the transition. "We weren't able to do that,'' she said. "To raise a large amount of capital wasn't really part of the culture of our school. So we decided to end the chapter and put the property up for sale. … We considered all of our options." At its peak in 2003, the school, which started in 1974 in a church on Central Avenue in St. Petersburg, had about 400 students. The recession, though, forced many parents to cut costs by removing their children from the school, where tuition is $8,850 for elementary school and $8,950 for middle school. As well, said Baraybar, in recent years the school has been losing seventh- and eighth-grade students to fundamental schools. Baraybar said her mother started out with a preschool and launched Wellington at the encouragement of parents. "It was always my dream that the legacy of Wellington would continue,'' she told parents in her letter. "As I reflect on the wonderful students that have come through the school over the years, I realize that our very own Wellington Alumni are in fact the legacy. They represent the result of the labor and commitment of so many fine educators and administrators over the years." Waveney Ann Moore can be reached at wmoore@sptimes.com or (727) 892-2283. By Waveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer Education,News,Neigh-South,Pinellas St. Petersburg's private Wellington School to close May 26 WMOOREN The Wellington School falls victim to a slow economy. It will close May 26. NMC Neigh Mid dhvnkh162buv dhvnk Private school's 36-year run to end Seminole 1 naywellington011211 Private school's 36-year run to end 2011-01-12 05:00:00.0 UTC 2011-01-12T00:00:00.000-05:00 Susan Baraybar, Wellington School&#8217;s chief operations manager and daughter of founders Andrew and Lorraine Pelosi, stands in the school&#8217;s Seminole campus science room with students, from left front, Zachary Sanders, 9, Nathan Sanders, 11, and, at back, Annabella Eckman, 6, and Raiya Eckman, 9. A letter announcing the school&#8217;s closing went out Jan. 3. resources/images/dti/2011/01/nal_wellington01121_158086a.jpg JIM DAMASKE | Times resources/images/dti/rendered/2011/01/nal_wellington01121_158086a_4col.jpgresources/images/dti/rendered/2011/01/nal_wellington01121_158086a_8col.jpg After 36 years, the Wellington School will close its doors in May. true templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2011/01/11/70683340-st-petersburgs-private-wellington-school-to-close-may-26 StaffArticle news,educationEducationEducation,News,Neigh-South,PinellasEducation,News,Neigh-South,PinellasWaveney Ann Moore 380267 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2012-10-25 12:32:05.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:32:05.000-04:00 waveney-ann-moore published Waveney Ann Moore <p>Waveney Ann Moore is a general assignment reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. She covers a wide range of topics in the metropolitan area, most recently the debate over the future of the St. Petersburg Pier.</p><p>She was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for <a href="http://web.tampabay.com/specials/2009/reports/marianna">"For Their Own Good,"</a> about abuse at Florida's oldest reform school. The series won the Dart Award for covering trauma, the Casey Medal for exemplary reporting on children and families and first place for nondeadline reporting in the 2010 Green Eyeshade competition run by the Society of Professional Journalists.</p><p>Moore was also a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer as part of a team that covered the story of the Rev. Henry Lyons, former head of the National Baptist Convention U.S.A.</p><p>She's a former reporter for the <i>Kansas City Star</i>.</p><p>Born in Guyana, on the northern coast of South America, she is a naturalized American citizen.</p> Times Staff Writer writers DTI 33745042 Waveney Ann Moore is a general assignment reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. She covers a wide range of topics in the metropolitan area, most recently the debate over the future of the St. Petersburg Pier. She was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for "For Their Own Good," about abuse at Florida's oldest reform school. The series won the Dart Award for covering trauma, the Casey Medal for exemplary reporting on children and families and first place for nondeadline reporting in the 2010 Green Eyeshade competition run by the Society of Professional Journalists. Moore was also a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer as part of a team that covered the story of the Rev. Henry Lyons, former head of the National Baptist Convention U.S.A. She's a former reporter for the Kansas City Star. Born in Guyana, on the northern coast of South America, she is a naturalized American citizen. <p>Phone: (727) 892-2283</p><p>Email: <a href="mailto:wmoore@tampabay.com">wmoore@tampabay.com</a></p> 1 resources/images/dti/2012/10/Moore_Waveney_wp.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/33745042-waveney-ann-moore AuthorProfile 2012-10-25 12:32:05.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:32:05.000-04:00 <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">WAVENEY ANN MOORE</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times Staff Writer 2262701 2016-01-25 20:38:02.0 UTC 7 Months Ago gap-stores-to-close-in-tampa-and-st-petersburg-on-tuesday news/business/retail Gap stores to close in Tampa and St. Petersburg on Tuesday StaffArticle 2264579 2016-02-08 20:21:58.0 UTC 7 Months Ago lululemon-is-the-first-store-to-close-in-st-petes-sundial news/business/retail Lululemon is the first store to close in St. Petersburg's Sundial StaffArticle 2283489 2016-06-29 03:10:48.0 UTC 2 Months Ago st-petersburg-roads-closed-after-pedestrian-fatality news/publicsafety/accidents St. Petersburg roads closed after pedestrian fatality StaffArticle <p>After 36 years, the Wellington School, a private, independent school for students from prekindergarten to eighth grade, is closing.</p> <p>With the recession taking its toll on enrollment, it fell to the daughter of founders Andrew and Lorraine Pelosi to announce the decision at the start of the new year.</p> <p>&quot;We have been supplementing the budget, and we just simply cannot afford to do that any longer,'' said Susan Baraybar, the Pelosis' daughter and chief operations manager.</p> <p>Last fall, the school moved all the students at its St. Petersburg campus, at 5175 45th St. N, to its smaller Seminole campus at 8000 Starkey Road, in an effort to balance the budget. The St. Petersburg campus remained open for offices and athletics.</p> <p>The last day for the school, which has 165 students, will be May 26.</p> <p>Wendy Miskewich, whose 8-year-old daughter, Justine, has been a student at Wellington since she was 4, said she is sad.</p> <p>&quot;I am very disappointed, because I thought Justine would be there until the eighth grade. But as disappointed as I am that they are closing, I am confident that Justine will do well because of the strong foundation that was provided for her,'' said Miskewich, a project manager for Hennessy Construction Services.</p> <p>&quot;I have known Susan Baraybar and her mom since before Justine was conceived,&quot; she said. &quot;I built their gym at their St. Pete campus. I remember when we had the ground-breaking ceremony. I was so impressed with the students.''</p> <p>The letter announcing the closing went out Jan. 3. Baraybar said it was timed to give families an opportunity to make other plans, including meeting the deadline for signing up for Pinellas County's fundamental schools.</p> <p>&quot;In looking beyond this year, we must be realistic in considering the challenges we are faced with regarding the continuation of Wellington School,'' the letter said.</p> <p>&quot;As you all know, we downsized to mostly one class per grade level. This was necessary due to space constraints and demand. The result of this condition leaves us vulnerable to attrition issues when students leave our school.''</p> <p>In her letter, Baraybar blamed the economy for proving &quot;to be a challenge to most independent schools.''</p> <p>Last year, the 30-year-old Pinellas County Jewish Day School was forced to close. Attempts to start another collapsed.</p> <p>Wellington tried to survive by attempting to become a nonprofit institution, Baraybar said. She said her family planned to donate a large portion of the value of the business and the Seminole property to the new organization, but a newly formed board of directors would have needed to raise additional money to fund the transition.</p> <p>&quot;We weren't able to do that,'' she said. &quot;To raise a large amount of capital wasn't really part of the culture of our school. So we decided to end the chapter and put the property up for sale. … We considered all of our options.&quot;</p> <p>At its peak in 2003, the school, which started in 1974<b> </b>in a church on Central Avenue in St. Petersburg, had about 400 students. The recession, though, forced many parents to cut costs by removing their children from the school, where tuition is $8,850 for elementary school and $8,950 for middle school.</p> <p>As well, said Baraybar, in recent years the school has been losing seventh- and eighth-grade students to fundamental schools. </p> <p>Baraybar said her mother started out with a preschool and launched Wellington at the encouragement of parents.</p> <p>&quot;It was always my dream that the legacy of Wellington would continue,'' she told parents in her letter. &quot;As I reflect on the wonderful students that have come through the school over the years, I realize that our very own Wellington Alumni are in fact the legacy. They represent the result of the labor and commitment of so many fine educators and administrators over the years.&quot;</p> <p><i>Waveney Ann Moore can be reached at wmoore@sptimes.com or (727) 892-2283.</i></p>trueruntime2016-08-30 05:26:40