Sunday, September 23, 2018
News Roundup

High Red Tide concentration found 10 miles off Pinellas, but no closer

ST. PETERSBURG — For the first time, state biologists have detected "high concentrations" of Red Tide algae off Pinellas County’s beaches.

Fortunately, it’s 10 miles offshore, west of the Pass-a-Grille North Channel, rather than close in where the beachgoers might inhale its noxious fumes.

"This was the first observation of ‘high’ concentrations offshore of Pinellas County," the bi-weekly report from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg noted.

Biologists found one fish kill on a Pinellas beach Wednesday, according to institute spokeswoman Kelly Richmond. They found 10 dead pigfish on Redington Beach, she said. That’s a far cry from the thousands upon thousands of snapper, snook and other fish that have clogged canals and littered beaches south of Tampa Bay.

There was good news in the report for those counties that have been hit hardest by the algae bloom this summer.

"Relative to last week … parts of Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee and Collier counties showed decreased cell concentrations, and none of the samples processed from Charlotte County over the past week contained ‘high’ concentrations," the report said.

It’s hard to say where the algae will end up next. The latest prediction from the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science says surface waters should move to the northwest, while sub-surface waters should go southeast.

The ongoing toxic bloom, which now covers 145 miles of Gulf of Mexico coastline, began in November. It has become the worst Red Tide in a decade, cutting a wide swath through the region’s marine life — fish, turtles, manatees and dolphins — even as it kills the waterfront economy.

A similar bloom of a freshwater blue-green algae is plaguing Lake Okeechobee and its adjacent waterways, and even shut down beaches in Martin County, on the state’s Atlantic side. But the two blooms are not directly connected with each other.

Nobody knows what causes the microscopic Red Tide algae to suddenly multiply by the millions and turn the water the color of rust. The blooms have been documented as far back as the days of the Spanish conquistadors. The species, Karenia brevis, was named in 2001 for Karen Steidinger, who spent decades studying the algae in her St. Petersburg lab.

Comments

Heart device seen as ‘huge advance’

Almost 2 million Americans have severe heart failure, and for them even mundane tasks can be extraordinarily difficult.Drugs may help to control the symptoms, but the disease takes a relentless course, and most people with severe heart failure do not...
Updated: 10 minutes ago

As world watches, Trump to make rounds at U.N.

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — President Donald Trump is poised to redouble his commitment to "America First" on the most global of stages this week. In the sequel to his stormy U.N. debut, Trump will stress his dedication to the primacy of U.S. interests while...
Updated: 16 minutes ago
Tiger Woods ends five-year win drought with Tour Championship title

Tiger Woods ends five-year win drought with Tour Championship title

ATLANTA — A comeback not even Tiger Woods saw coming a year ago.A chaotic celebration that golf hadn't seen even in the best of times.Woods delivered the perfect ending to his amazing return from four back surgeries Sunday with a performance th...
Updated: 20 minutes ago
MPOs survey SouthShore residents about transportation needs

MPOs survey SouthShore residents about transportation needs

RUSKIN -- The Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas Metropolitan Planning Organizations say the time is now to improve the area's transit needs.The organizations continued their joint effort to survey the thoughts of residents at a Sept. 13 community mee...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Police: Car runs red light, killing woman on motor scooter in St. Petersburg

Police: Car runs red light, killing woman on motor scooter in St. Petersburg

ST. PETERSBURGCar runs red light, killing woman on motor scooterA woman died after a driver ran a red light on 5th Avenue N and hit her motor scooter early Sunday morning, police reported.Vallis Ann Oswain, 58, was driving the scooter northbound on 8...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Residents prepare for more flooding

Residents prepare for more flooding

BLADENBORO, N.C. — Thousands of coastal residents remained on edge Sunday, told they may need to leave their homes because rivers are still rising more than a week after Hurricane Florence slammed into the Carolinas. About 6,000 to 8,000 people in Ge...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Tiger Woods caps off amazing comeback with a win

Tiger Woods caps off amazing comeback with a win

ATLANTA — A comeback not even Tiger Woods saw coming a year ago.A chaotic celebration that golf hasn't seen even in the best of times.Woods delivered the perfect ending to his amazing return from four back surgeries on Sunday with a performanc...
Updated: 1 hour ago
The deadliest battle

The deadliest battle

Associated PressMen in WWI military uniforms kneel Sunday in the Meuse-Argonne cemetery in northeastern France during a remembrance ceremony. The Meuse-Argonne offensive began on Sept. 26, 1918, and was America’s deadliest battle ever, with 26,000 U....
Updated: 1 hour ago
Matt Baker’s AP Top 25 ballot: Florida’s new top team

Matt Baker’s AP Top 25 ballot: Florida’s new top team

After four full weekends of college football, here's what I know:There is one great team (Alabama). There are three very good teams (Georgia, Ohio State and Clemson).After that? There are a lot of flawed teams with messy results that seem bunched tog...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Lightning journal: Roster trimmed to 28

Lightning journal: Roster trimmed to 28

TAMPA – After Sunday morning, the Lightning sat five cuts away from having a 23-man roster to start the regular season.It announced 27 cuts that left 28 players on the roster with the start of the regular season less than two weeks away.Gone ar...
Updated: 2 hours ago