Tropical Storm Gordon may have broken up some of Florida’s Red Tide

A sign warning visitors of Red Tide can be seen on Longboat Key beach on Aug. 30. [BRONTE WITTPENN  |  Times]
A sign warning visitors of Red Tide can be seen on Longboat Key beach on Aug. 30. [BRONTE WITTPENN | Times]
Published September 7 2018
Updated September 7 2018

Curse Tropical Storm Gordon for washing out Labor Day plans in Tampa Bay, but the storm may have carried a silver lining in its outer bands: it may have broken up the Red Tide bloom plaguing southwest Florida.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission reported late Friday that tests revealed decreased concentrations of the organism in Sarasota and Collier counties.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Red Tide’s toxic toll — your questions answered (w/video).

"Persistent surface currents — prior to, during, and after the passage of Tropical Storm Gordon — likely played a role" in pushing parts of the bloom northwest, the report said.

Red Tide was still in high concentrations off of Sarasota, Charlotte and Lee counties, and in lower concentrations off of Pinellas, Manatee and Collier counties.

RELATED: Recalling the devastating Red Tide of 2005 and dreading a repeat

The bloom began in November and is Florida’s worst this decade, killing scores of fish, sea turtles, manatees and dolphins. It also causes respiratory problems for humans.

Advertisement