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Clearwater Marine Aquarium turtle rehab center admits year's first loggerhead hatchling

A 3-inch-long loggerhead sea turtle hatchling swims in a holding tank on Wednesday in the intensive care unit at Clearwater Marine Aquarium. This is the first loggerhead hatchling of the year admitted into rehab at CMA. The hatchling, named Amaretto, was found this week by a morning turtle nesting patrol in the skimmer of a condo's swimming pool in Indian Shores, and likely lost its way after becoming disoriented by artificial lighting along the beach, said Tess Adams of the aquarium.

A three-inch-long juvenile loggerhead sea turtle hatchling swims in a holding tank on Wednesday (8/6/214) after being been admitted into the ICU at Clearwater Marine Aquarium. This is the first loggerhead hatchling of the year admitted into rehab at CMA. The hatchling, named Amaretto, was found earlier this week by a morning turtle nesting patrol in the skimmer of a condo‚€™s swimming pool in Indian Shores, and likely lost its way after becoming disoriented by artificial lighting along the beach, according to Tess Adams, with the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. Although found in good condition Amaretto was admitted for rehabilitation at CMA because it consumed most of its yolk sack swimming in the skimmer. Hatchlings use the yolk sack for energy to swim out to a weed line once they enter the water. Because biologists were not certain Amaretto would live if released from shore when found it will remain with CMA until they are confident in it‚€™s ability to survive then will coordinate a release at a remote weed line in the Gulf of Mexico via boat transport.

DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD

A three-inch-long juvenile loggerhead sea turtle hatchling swims in a holding tank on Wednesday (8/6/214) after being been admitted into the ICU at Clearwater Marine Aquarium. This is the first loggerhead hatchling of the year admitted into rehab at CMA. The hatchling, named Amaretto, was found earlier this week by a morning turtle nesting patrol in the skimmer of a condo‚€™s swimming pool in Indian Shores, and likely lost its way after becoming disoriented by artificial lighting along the beach, according to Tess Adams, with the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. Although found in good condition Amaretto was admitted for rehabilitation at CMA because it consumed most of its yolk sack swimming in the skimmer. Hatchlings use the yolk sack for energy to swim out to a weed line once they enter the water. Because biologists were not certain Amaretto would live if released from shore when found it will remain with CMA until they are confident in it‚€™s ability to survive then will coordinate a release at a remote weed line in the Gulf of Mexico via boat transport.

Clearwater Marine Aquarium turtle rehab center admits year's first loggerhead hatchling 08/06/14 [Last modified: Thursday, August 7, 2014 11:37am]

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