Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Flavorful, succulent skirt steak makes a quick and delicious dinner on the grill

With a deep, beefy taste and succulent texture, skirt steak with a garlic-herb paste makes a delicious and quick dinner on the grill.

New York Times

With a deep, beefy taste and succulent texture, skirt steak with a garlic-herb paste makes a delicious and quick dinner on the grill.

Skirt steak isn't winning any beauty pageants. It's a long, lanky, awkward contender for your grill. You won't be able to give it those pronounced crosshatched grill lines, and its flat shape gives you thin, squiggly slices rather than nice, wide planks. If you want pretty and iconic, splurge on a rib or strip steak.

But for a weeknight dinner when you want a deep, beefy taste and succulent texture, you can't get a better steak than skirt. It even trumps flank steak, my former go-to for throwing on the grill.

What flank and skirt steaks have in common are their brawny, mineral flavor and loose-knit flesh, which is ideal for absorbing marinade. While both are sliced from the underbelly of the cow, skirt steak has the advantage of being richer and more marbled with fat; that means you use marinade for flavor only, rather than relying on it to tenderize the meat. (That's not the case with leaner flank steak.)

When I'm pressed for time, I'll often just unwrap my skirt steak, pat it down with salt and pepper and throw it onto the grill. It needs nothing more.

In this recipe, I rub down the meat with a classic basil-flecked herb paste, heavy on the garlic. If you have the time, you should marinate your meat the day before you plan to cook it. This gives it plenty of time to soak up the flavors. But you can also just slather on the herb paste as you're getting ready to cook.

A word about the grill: If you have one, use it. There's simply no better way to get a deep char on the ample surface of a skirt steak. If you don't, you can cook the meat in batches in a menacingly hot cast-iron pan, as long as you open the windows and turn off the smoke alarm first. Or try it under the broiler, positioning the steak as close to the flames as possible without touching them.

Whatever your heat source, pull the steak off once the center hits rare to medium-rare. Don't veer into medium-well territory with this cut or you risk the steak turning chewy and tough.

Finally, slice the meat across the grainy muscle fibers at a 45-degree angle, rather than straight up and down. Not only will this give you attractive slices, it will also maximize tenderness.

If you want glamor, grill a big, pretty rib-eye.

But in the categories of succulence, taste and cost, skirt steak takes the crown, no contest.

>>moderate

Grilled Skirt Steak With Garlic and Herbs

1 cup basil leaves, more for garnish

3 scallions, white and green parts, thinly sliced, more for garnish

2 tablespoons lemon thyme leaves, more for garnish

2 fat garlic cloves, roughly chopped

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped peperoncini (1 to 2 peppers), pickled jalapeno or other pickled peppers

2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

Juice of half a lemon

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 ½ pounds skirt steak

In a blender or food processor, combine basil, scallions, lemon thyme, garlic, peperoncini, salt and lemon zest and juice. Pour olive oil over mixture; blend until it turns to paste.

Using paper towels, pat steak dry and place in a large bowl; slather paste mixture all over meat. Cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes or overnight.

Light the grill. Use a paper towel to pat steak dry. (You can leave some of the paste, but for the best sear, the meat should be dry when it hits the grill.) Grill meat over direct heat until char lines appear and meat is done to taste, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Let rest for 5 minutes before slicing against the grain and serving, garnished with herbs and scallions.

Serves 8.

Source: New York Times

Flavorful, succulent skirt steak makes a quick and delicious dinner on the grill 08/15/14 [Last modified: Monday, August 18, 2014 3:14pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, New York Times.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Can the Bad Boys Mowers Gasparilla Bowl thrive in competitive sports market?

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — It's a funky name: the Bad Boys Mowers Gasparilla Bowl. But the new sponsors for the former St. Petersburg Bowl might need more than an eye-catching name to create a thriving, profitable contest.

    NC State head coach Dave Doeren clutches the championship trophy after winning the Bitcoin Bowl at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg in 2014. Bowl organizers are changing the name of the game to the Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl.
[

MONICA HERNDON | TIMES]
  2. Dirk Koetter says Bucs used team meeting to discuss social issues

    Bucs

    Four days before their preseason home opener against the Cleveland Browns, which had 12 players not stand for the national anthem prior to their last game, the Bucs used their team meeting to discuss social issues that might have led to that demonstration, coach Dirk Koetter said.

    "The main thing is we have to respect everybody's opinion," Dirk Koetter said, "because everybody is not going to agree." [AP photo]
  3. Rookie tight end Antony Auclair making case to stick with Bucs

    Bucs

    Don't let his modest preseason stats fool you: Antony Auclair, the undrafted rookie tight end from Canada is making a strong case to stick around on the Bucs' 53-man roster this season.

    Bucs tight end Antony Auclair (82) collides with a defender following a catch during training camp. [CHARLIE KAIJO   |   Times]
  4. Who is that 'Blacks for Trump' guy standing behind the president at his Phoenix rally

    National

    At a number of political rallies over the last two years, a character calling himself "Michael the Black Man" has appeared in the crowd directly behind Donald Trump, impossible to miss and possibly planted.

    Michael the Black Man, variously known as Michael Symonette, Maurice Woodside and Mikael Israel, holds up a sign as President Donald Trump speaks to a crowd at the Phoenix Convention Center during a rally on Tuesday in Phoenix, Arizona.  [Ralph Freso | Getty Images]
  5. Off-duty Manatee County deputy saves couple from burning car

    Public Safety

    MANATEE COUNTY — Neil and Claudia Cook are lucky to be alive after an off-duty deputy spotted them trapped in their smoking car and rescued them just before it became engulfed in flames on …

    Neil and Claudia Cook were trapped in their smoking car on Sunday when an off-duty deputy kicked out the window, rescuing them just before the car became engulfed in flames. [Courtesy of Manatee County Sheriff's Office]