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Girl gets double-lung transplant

In a photo provided by the Murnaghans, Sarah Murnaghan, center, celebrates the 100th day of her stay in Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with her father, Fran, and mother, Janet. The girl received a lung transplant there Wednesday.

Associated Press

In a photo provided by the Murnaghans, Sarah Murnaghan, center, celebrates the 100th day of her stay in Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with her father, Fran, and mother, Janet. The girl received a lung transplant there Wednesday.

PHILADELPHIA — A 10-year-old girl whose efforts to qualify for an organ donation spurred public debate over how organs are allocated underwent a successful double-lung transplant on Wednesday, a family spokeswoman said.

Sarah Murnaghan, who suffers from severe cystic fibrosis, received new lungs from an adult donor at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, spokeswoman Tracy Simon said.

The Murnaghan family said it was thrilled to share the news that Sarah was out of surgery.

"Her doctors are very pleased with both her progress during the procedure and her prognosis for recovery," the family said in a statement.

Sarah went into surgery around 11 a.m. Wednesday, and the procedure lasted about six hours, her family said.

"The surgeons had no challenges resizing and transplanting the donor lungs — the surgery went smoothly, and Sarah did extremely well," the family said in the statement.

Sarah's family and the family of another cystic fibrosis patient at the same hospital challenged transplant policy that made children under 12 wait for pediatric lungs to become available or be offered lungs donated by adults only after adolescents and adults on the waiting list had been considered. They said pediatric lungs are rarely donated.

Sarah's health was deteriorating when a judge intervened in her case last week, giving her a chance at the much larger list of organs from adult donors. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson ruled June 5 that Sarah and 11-year-old Javier Acosta, of New York City, should be eligible for adult lungs.

Critics warned there could be a downside to having judges intervene in the organ transplant system's established procedures. Lung transplants are difficult procedures, and some experts say child patients tend to have more trouble with them than adults do.

No other details about the donor lungs are known, including whether they came through the regular donor system or through public appeals.

Sarah's relatives, who are from Newtown Square, just west of Philadelphia, were "beyond excited" about her new lungs but were "keeping in mind that someone had to lose a family member and they're very aware of that and very appreciative," family spokeswoman Maureen Garrity said earlier Wednesday.

Sarah's mother, Janet Murnaghan, said in a Facebook post that the family was "overwhelmed with emotions" and thanked all her supporters. She said the donor's family "has experienced a tremendous loss, may God grant them a peace that surpasses understanding."

The national organization that manages organ transplants, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, added Sarah to the adult waiting list after the judge's ruling. Her transplant came two days before a hearing was scheduled on the family's request for a broader injunction.

The network has said 31 children under age 11 are on the waiting list for a lung transplant. Its executive committee held an emergency meeting this week but resisted making emergency rule changes for children under 12 who are waiting on lungs, instead creating a special appeal and review system to hear such cases.

Girl gets double-lung transplant 06/12/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 10:24pm]
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