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Grand Canyon proposes backcountry management changes

Grand Canyon to make changes

The Grand Canyon wants to change the way backcountry areas are managed as more outdoor enthusiasts take to the park's open spaces, with proposals that would require hikers using the most popular inner-canyon trails to spend a few dollars on a permit. Millions of people visit the Grand Canyon each year, taking in the sweeping views from developed areas where they can stroll along the rim, grab a bite to eat and hop on a shuttle bus to other outlooks. Far fewer people venture into the 1.1 million acres that make up the backcountry, including trails below the canyon rim. Officials are trying to get a better handle on how many people are walking down trails such as Bright Angel and South Kaibab from the South Rim, and North Kaibab from the North Rim. Options for a new management plan include a day-use permit for hiking more than 5 miles below the rim and paying a minimum $5 fee.

Activist returning home years later

American activist Lori Berenson is finally heading home to New York, two decades after being found guilty of aiding leftist rebels in Peru. She has been living in Lima with her 6-year-old son since her 2010 parole because she was barred from leaving the country until her 20-year sentence lapsed. Berenson, 46, told the Associated Press that occurred Sunday. Fearing being mobbed by reporters on leaving, she would not disclose details of her travel plans. She said she obtained a bachelor's degree in sociology online last year and plans to live in New York City with her parents for now. A daughter of college professors, she dropped out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and went to Latin America to support leftist movements. She worked for El Salvador rebels before going to Peru in 1994.

Red Kettle gift: $500,000 check

Salvation Army officials in Minnesota and North Dakota said a couple dropped a $500,000 check into a red kettle Saturday outside a Cub Foods in suburban Minneapolis. Spokeswoman Annette Bauer said it's the biggest check ever in the Minneapolis area and likely the biggest ever in the two states. Bauer said the couple has a history of donations and prefers to remain anonymous.

Associated Press

Grand Canyon proposes backcountry management changes 11/30/15 [Last modified: Monday, November 30, 2015 9:11pm]
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