Guantanamo Bay detainee is first to be sent home unwillingly

washington

detainee first to be sent home unwillingly

The Obama administration has for the first time sent a detainee at Guantanamo Bay back home against his will. Aziz Abdul Naji, 35, an Algerian who had been held for more than eight years, appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to remain at the military detention center in Cuba. He argued he would be tortured or killed in Algeria, either by the government or by terrorist groups that might try to recruit him. In a unanimous decision, the justices declined late Friday to hear Naji's appeal, and the Defense Department announced Monday that he had been repatriated. Also on Friday, the court ruled 5-3 that the executive branch could proceed with the transfer of another Algerian detainee, Fahri Saeed bin Mohammad.

kansas city, MO.

Special Olympics ousts ex-priest

A former Roman Catholic priest who was part of a $5 million sex abuse settlement in Wisconsin two decades ago was suspended from a volunteer position with Special Olympics Missouri and has admitted some of the abuse. Tom Ericksen, 62, was suspended indefinitely last week and admitted in an interview with the Associated Press Monday that he had fondled three boys but denied having contact with a fourth child involved in the 1989 settlement.

west virginia

Special election set to fill Byrd's seat

A legislative compromise cleared the way for a fall election to fill the late Robert Byrd's U.S. Senate seat. The measure, which sets an Aug. 28 primary and Nov. 2 general election, allows Shelley Moore Capito to run for Byrd's seat and a sixth U.S. House term. She's considered the GOP's top prospect for winning the seat.

iraq

Anti-American cleric meets with ex-premier

Anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr took a rare, public step into the political arena, meeting in Syria with the man directly challenging Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki for his office. The talks between Sadr, who is nominally allied with Maliki, and former premier Ayad Allawi, who heads the heavily Sunni-backed Iraqiya coalition, appeared to be as much about showing Maliki that Sadr is keeping his options open as it was about any firm political agreement between the two men in the offing. Sadr rarely travels outside of his home base in Iran, where he lives in self-imposed exile. His followers won 39 seats in the 325-seat parliament in national election in March, giving him considerable sway over who becomes the next prime minister.

san francisco

Free speech fight in lost iPhone saga ends

A brewing free-speech debate touched off by a lost prototype of Apple's iPhone has ended quietly with a blogger's agreement to cooperate with investigators. Thomas J. Nolan Jr., a lawyer for Jason Chen of Gizmodo.com, said the technology website agreed to the deal with prosecutors to resolve the case as quickly as possible. A judge on Friday ordered a search warrant withdrawn and seized items returned to Chen. The website posted images in April of a prototype iPhone left in a Redwood City bar by an Apple employee. Gizmodo said it paid money for the phone.

Elsewhere

OKLAHOMA CITY: A judge granted an injunction blocking enforcement of a state law that would require women seeking abortions to have an ultrasound and listen to a detailed description of the fetus.

UNITED NATIONS: The U.N. Economic and Social Council voted to accredit the U.S.-based International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, allowing it to attend U.N. meetings, submit statements and collaborate with both government and U.N. agencies on human rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Times wires

Guantanamo Bay detainee is first to be sent home unwillingly 07/20/10 [Last modified: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 12:01am]

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