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Retired Army Staff Sgt. Alex Dillman and his wife, Holly, have set aside a room in their house in New Tampa for a nursery. The VA will not pay for IVF treatements for the couple.  [Photo by Edward Linsmier for the Washington Post]

What VA benefits won't cover: a chance for wounded veterans to have children

TAMPA — After Army Staff Sgt. Alex Dillman was paralyzed from the abdomen down in a bomb blast in Afghanistan, the Department of Veterans Affairs paid to retrofit his Chevy Silverado truck so he could drive it and bought him a handcycle so he could exercise. But the agency that cares for former troops won't pay for …

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Get moving to avoid physical, mental decline

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Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

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  1. Study reveals flaws in gene testing; results often conflict

    Medicine

    The first report from a big public-private project to improve genetic testing reveals it is not as rock solid as many people believe, with flaws that result in some people wrongly advised to worry about a disease risk and others wrongly told they can relax.

  2. Shriners Hospitals joins Mayo Clinic network to enhance physician collaboration

    Medicine

    TAMPA — Mayo Clinic expertise will now be available to patients and providers at Shriners Hospitals for Children as part of a new network relationship between the health care systems.

  3. Get moving to avoid physical, mental decline

    Health

    Retaining energy and vitality as you venture into the senior years can be a happy reality.

    Paul Merada and Tracy Decker show how to do a bodyweight with partner squat.
  4. Health law's disputed phrase may have been an oversight

    Health

    WASHINGTON — They are only four words in a 900-page law: "established by the state."

  5. Peeking into healthy brains to see if Alzheimer's is brewing

    Research

    WASHINGTON — Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer's are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking.

    In this photo taken May 19, 2015, Judith Chase Gilbert, of Arlington, Va., is loaded into a PET scanner by Nuclear Medicine Technologist J.R. Aguilar at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Gilbert shows no signs of memory problems but volunteered for a new kind of scan as part of a study peeking into healthy brains to check for clues about Alzheimer's disease.  [Evan Vucci | Associated Press]
  6. Florida dentist accused of running 'house of horrors' agrees to quit

    Health

    A Florida children's dentist accused of running a "house of horrors" that included performing surgical procedures without anesthetic agreed late Friday to stop practicing dentistry.

    Protesters wave signs outside Schneider’s dentist office last month in Jacksonville. The children’s dentist performed unnecessary tooth extractions without anesthetic, parents say.
  7. In overweight teens, food ads appeal to mouth and brain

    Health

    When a sitcom's laugh track stops and the camera pans seductively up the height of a glistening bacon cheeseburger, the teen brain snaps to attention — especially if that brain sits atop a body that carries excess fat, a new study says.

  8. Bardmoor Outpatient Center in Largo closes due to sprinkler malfunction

    Medicine

    LARGO — Due to a fire sprinkler malfunction and flooding inside the building, the Bardmoor Outpatient Center at 8787 Bryan Dairy Road is mostly closed today.

  9. New campaign aims to prevent accidental child deaths

    Health

    TAMPA — In the past five years, 150 children in the Tampa Bay area died from accidental drowning, head trauma or suffocation — all of them preventable, according to the Florida Department of Children and Families.

  10. Doctor group seeks to clear confusion in cancer screening

    Medicine

    WASHINGTON — Screening for cancer has gotten more complicated in recent years with evolving guidelines that sometimes conflict. Now a doctors' group aims to ease some confusion — and encourage more discussion of testing's pros and cons — with advice on screening for five types of tumors.