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Health

  1. Great American Smokeout: Tips to quit smoking

    Health

    Thursday is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout, time to make a plan to quit.

  2. Early statin use may give long-term heart benefits

    Health

    CHICAGO — Taking a cholesterol-lowering drug for five years in middle age can lower heart and death risks for decades afterward, and the benefits seem to grow over time, a landmark study finds. Doctors say it's the first evidence that early use of a statin can have a legacy effect, perhaps changing someone's odds …

  3. Mexican boy has massive tumor removed in U.S. (w/video)

    Health

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had been suffering from a massive tumor and drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in New Mexico had the growth removed after a long surgery, a church said Tuesday.

    In this July 20, 2012, file photo, the father of a Ciudad Juarez-born boy suffering from a massive tumor who U.S. Homeland Security identified only as "Jose," examines his shoulder at the First Baptist Church of Rio Rancho, N.M.  The 11-year-old Mexican boy, who had been suffering from the massive tumor and came to New Mexico for treatment, has had the growth removed. The boy underwent surgery Monday at the University of New Mexico Children's Hospital to remove the tumor from his neck, shoulder and torso area. [Associated Press]
  4. At USF visit, Obama official talks up health care law

    Health

    TAMPA — The Obama administration official overseeing the health insurance marketplaces said Monday that she's pleased with how the federal website is working so far and confident more than 9 million Americans will sign up for coverage by February.

    Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell, left, spoke Monday at the University of South Florida in Tampa. At rear is U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Tampa.
  5. New research finds sexting is the 'new norm' for teens

    Health

    Texting and "sexting," sending sexually explicit messages via mobile phone, are firmly entrenched in the high school dating scene these days, but until now little solid data has existed on to what extent these social media connections have been misused to control, harass, threaten or stalk.

  6. Health workers begin new push around state

    Health

    FORT LAUDERDALE — From a tailgating party with Gator fans in Gainesville to a beer festival in Pensacola, Floridians had plenty of opportunities Saturday to get in-person help signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

  7. Tampa Bay Heart Walk gets a healthy turnout

    Health

    Around 35,000 people participated in the Tampa Bay Heart Walk on Saturday at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, which aims to raise awareness of heart disease and promote a heart-healthy lifestyle as well as honoring survivors of heart disease and strokes.

    Karen Cychmistruk of Tampa and her daughter Carly-Dawn, 5, listen to the national anthem before the start of the Tampa Bay Heart Walk on Saturday.
  8. Tampa Bay experts discuss Ebola preparedness

    Health

    TAMPA — Back in July, Dr. Douglas Holt got an invitation to help teach a one-day course on the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Holt, the director of the Hillsborough County Health Department, agreed but wondered: Who's interested in Ebola?

    Before long, he got an answer.

  9. Linda Osmundson, CASA director and Christian Scientist, prays for healing without medicine

    Health

    ST. PETERSBURG

    Linda Osmundson is a domestic violence survivor who has helped thousands of women break from their abusers and find new lives.

    Linda Osmundson, director of Community Action Stops Abuse, has led the organization for 25 years. She was honored Oct. 30 with a celebration at Soft Water Studios in St. Petersburg. Osmundson says illness will not get in the way of her seeing CASA’s new $12 million shelter finished.
  10. Blame and shame won't control diabetes, but action can

    Health

    A few days ago, the last remaining Ebola patient in the United States, a New York physician who treated patients in Africa, got the all clear and is back at home. The two nurses in Dallas who contracted the disease from Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who died at their hospital, also are doing fine.

    Dr. Munira Siddiqui