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Health

Richard Tracy of Crystal Beach is examined by nurse practitioner Jan Humphreys at the Clearwater Free Clinic on Tuesday.CHERIE DIEZ | Times

Scott veto of money to free clinics decried as another blow to poor, uninsured Floridians

CLEARWATER — As patients streamed into the Clearwater Free Clinic with a range of medical concerns Tuesday, clinic administrators were contemplating an altogether different problem: the sudden appearance of a $100,000 hole in their $950,000 operating budget. Cutting staff is not an option, executive director Jeanni …

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Florida seeing highest number of new HIV cases in the nation

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Citrus consumption and skin cancer: How real is the link?

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  1. Genetic study leads to an intriguing question: Do blue eyes make you a drinker?

    Health

    As she polished off a piña colada at a St. Petersburg tiki bar called The Getaway, Shay Anthony pondered whether her striking blue-green eyes had anything to do with her social drinking habits.

     comment on a study that links blue eyes to heavier drinking at The Getaway bar in St. Petersburg. [KATHLEEN MCGRORY | Times]
  2. Multiple factors at work as many brace for higher health insurance premiums in 2016

    Health

    The Affordable Care Act has weathered its share of punches in recent weeks, including a Supreme Court challenge that could have led to its unravelling.

  3. Florida seeing highest number of new HIV cases in the nation

    Health

    At the height of the epidemic, the nurses wouldn't touch him. His mother had to give him a sponge bath in his hospital bed.

  4. Scott veto of money to free clinics decried as another blow to poor, uninsured Floridians

    Health

    CLEARWATER — As patients streamed into the Clearwater Free Clinic with a range of medical concerns Tuesday, clinic administrators were contemplating an altogether different problem: the sudden appearance of a $100,000 hole in their $950,000 operating budget.

    Richard Tracy of Crystal Beach is examined by nurse practitioner Jan Humphreys at the Clearwater Free Clinic on Tuesday.
  5. Citrus consumption and skin cancer: How real is the link?

    Research

    A large study published Monday that looked at the dietary patterns of more than 100,000 Americans discovered an unexpected link between high consumption of citrus — specifically whole grapefruit and orange juice — and risk of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

  6. Sugary drinks linked to 25,000 deaths a year in U.S.

    Health

    By contributing to obesity and, through that, to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks appears to kill about 25,000 American adults yearly and is linked worldwide to the deaths of 180,000 each year, new research says.

    A display shows the amount of sugar, as measured in cubes, that are found within different size cups of soda.
  7. A first: New guidelines back device for treating strokes

    Medicine

    Many stroke patients have a new treatment option — if they seek help fast enough to get it. New guidelines endorse using a removable stent to open clogged arteries causing a stroke.

  8. California Legislature passes strict school vaccine bill

    Health

    California lawmakers Monday sent the governor a contentious bill that would impose one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country in reaction to a measles outbreak at Disneyland.

  9. New questions about why more women than men have Alzheimer's

    Health

    WASHINGTON — Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women, and now some scientists are questioning the long-held assumption that it's just because they tend to live longer than men.

    Amy Shives speaks about her experience with Alzheimer's disease, which she was diagnosed with in 2011, at her house, Wednesday, June 3, 2015, in Spokane, Wash.  Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women, and now some scientists are questioning the long-held assumption that it's just because women tend to live longer than men. [Associated Press]
  10. More women in their 30s and 40s are having babies

    Health

    Advanced maternal age.

    The three words make Laura Byrne cringe.

    Byrne, of Tampa, will be almost 35 when she gives birth to her second child next month, making her an "older mom" in the eyes of her doctor. But she doesn't regret having waited to have a family, she said. It enabled her to pursue a fast-paced …

    Laura Byrne, 34, who is pregnant with her second child, plays with her 2-year-old, J.R., in Kate Jackson Community Center in Tampa on Thursday, June 25, 2015. The national birth rate is on the rise for the first time in seven years -- and it's largely because more women in their 30s and 40s are having kids. 
JOHN PENDYGRAFT  |  TIMES