Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Health

A MUST FOR COLLEGE: safety

If you are sending a child off to college, you no doubt are filling his or her head with lots of good advice. I know my parents did.

The precollege tip that I remember most clearly (and the one that may have been the most valuable), however, came from my brother:

"Never drink the punch at parties.''

This really stuck with me. Partly because I had never before known him to counsel against anything involving a party.

But mostly because he was already in college and therefore in a far better position to dispense wisdom than our well-meaning but ancient parents.

It's tough to beat advice from smart peers.

If you don't have a big brother handy, you might consider listening to a Vanderbilt University senior named Dallas Jessup.

Dallas was just 14 when she saw the story of Carlie Brucia, the 11-year-old girl whose abduction from a Sarasota car wash was captured on video.

Dallas thought girls ought to know how to defend themselves, so she started a movement.

Just Yell Fire! was her first project, a video that delivered a powerful message to young girls: Don't let anybody mess with you. Kick, punch, scream, run, make a scene, and yes, just yell fire.

Watch the video (it's free to view at www.justyellfire.com), and you'll see why Dallas won lots of national attention and a Teen Choice Award.

Now she's back with a new edition: Just Yell Fire: Campus Life, at the same website. Dallas and a group of actors and martial arts experts (she's a black belt in tae kwon do) depict a series of situations that will be familiar to anyone who has gone to college, even us ancients.

We see a harmless-looking guy persuade a girl to let him into a dorm building. He gets into another girl's room and attacks her.

I nearly stopped watching, thinking back on how many times I would let harmless looking people into my dorm, just because I thought that was what polite girls did. Sheesh.

Then the video shows the "victim'' fighting back and escaping, followed by step-by-step instructions from Dallas and a martial arts instructor showing how she did it — and how you can too.

More scenarios follow: A date rape, an attack in a deserted part of campus and another in a parking garage. And yes, a party where somebody slips drugs into a girl's drink.

Just the kind of thing my brother warned me about.

I'd be the last person to suggest you send your kids off to school in a state of terror. I loved college, and I hope your kids do too.

Fear is not what Dallas' project is all about. Her video shows how good situations can go bad, so that — ideally — you can stay out of harm's way.

You're walking through the parking garage and get a creepy feeling? Trust it. Ask a security guard to walk you to your car.

You're on a date that gets too hot for comfort? No means no, and if your date can't grasp that, kick, claw, scream and run. Call the police. Rape is rape, no matter what some dim politician says. It's not your fault.

One in five women will be the victim of a rape or attempted rape during their college years, the Justice Department estimates. Less than 5 percent of those crimes are reported.

Just Yell Fire: Campus Life is not going to turn you into a martial arts master, though it may prompt you to sign up for classes.

But it could inspire thoughtful reflection, planning and action regarding safety, boundaries and self-worth.

Okay, class dismissed.

Charlotte Sutton can be reached at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter @SuttonTimes.

Comments
Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

GENEVA ó Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual worlds. The World Health Organization says they now should be on guard for a danger in the real world: spending too much time playing. In its latest revision to a disease class...
Published: 06/19/18
Funded by Alcohol Industry, Federal Study on Drinking Is Shut Down

Funded by Alcohol Industry, Federal Study on Drinking Is Shut Down

The extensive government trial was intended to settle an age-old question about alcohol and diet: Does a daily cocktail or beer really protect against heart attacks and stroke?To find out, the National Institutes of Health gave scientists $100 millio...
Published: 06/16/18
More than a third of American adults take prescription drugs that may increase risk of depression, study says

More than a third of American adults take prescription drugs that may increase risk of depression, study says

More than a third of American adults are taking prescription drugs, including hormones for contraception, blood pressure medications and medicines for heartburn, that carry a potential risk of depression, according to a study published in the Journal...
Published: 06/12/18
Itís time to use the stingray shuffle to avoid a nasty sting

Itís time to use the stingray shuffle to avoid a nasty sting

Courtney Bilyeu was running toward the murky water alongside a few military officers when it happened.She was an accountant for the U.S. Navy at the time. And on her way to take a swim with some coworkers in a California beach, she saw blood. The wat...
Published: 06/12/18
Itís important to wear sunglasses even on cloudy days, ophthalmologists say

Itís important to wear sunglasses even on cloudy days, ophthalmologists say

The next time you head to the drugstore to buy sunscreen, donít forget to pick up some sunglasses, too. Thatís because both products work to protect your body from the sunís damaging ultraviolet rays.Wearing sunglasses for protection should not be re...
Published: 06/09/18
In St. Pete, kidney patients gather for science and solidarity

In St. Pete, kidney patients gather for science and solidarity

ST. PETERSBURG ó Kidney disease doesnít discriminate.The crowd of more than 200 patients who gathered at the Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort range in age from teenagers to seniors. They are of different ethnicities and come from all over the...
Published: 06/08/18
Mayo Clinic Q&A: melanomas of the eye; how long should you take a beta blocker?

Mayo Clinic Q&A: melanomas of the eye; how long should you take a beta blocker?

YES, MELANOMAS CAN BEGIN IN THE EYEIs it true that melanoma can develop in the eyes? If so, how common is it? How is it treated?Melanomas can begin in the eye, a condition called intraocular melanoma. Treatment for intraocular melanomas used to prima...
Published: 06/08/18
For writer, using a heart rate monitor takes HIIT from frightening to fun

For writer, using a heart rate monitor takes HIIT from frightening to fun

High-intensity interval training is one of the biggest trends in fitness, but it has always seemed a bit scary to me. To a mere mortal with achy knees and an aging body, even the acronym ó HIIT ó sounded intimidating.But recently, I overcame my fears...
Published: 06/08/18
Enjoy broccolini the Italian way: Ďdraggedí

Enjoy broccolini the Italian way: Ďdraggedí

By KATIE WORKMANOne of the amazing things about Italian food is that the best dishes are often so completely, refreshingly simple. Like, four-ingredient simple. (We donít count olive oil and salt. Or water. Or air.) I love broccoli. I can roast brocc...
Published: 06/08/18
What to get Dad? Try a Fatherís Day gift that will do him good

What to get Dad? Try a Fatherís Day gift that will do him good

Dads are notoriously tough to shop for. Theyíre not all that great at dropping hints, the way moms do, and if you ask what your dad might want or need for Fatherís Day, heíll likely say, "Nothing" or "Donít spend your money" or "I just want to be wit...
Published: 06/08/18