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GETTING fit

Bit by bit, a more fit workplace

Nearly all of us need to make more time for fitness. Finding that time, though, can seem impossible.

But what if you could wedge that workout in at work? If it sounds farfetched (or a great way to get yourself fired), listen up.

Dr. James Levine, an obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic, says Americans don't need to log more time at a gym. Instead, they need to banish their sedentary ways by incorporating easy bursts of activity from dawn to dusk.

He calls it NEAT fitness, which stands for non-exercise activity thermogenesis. In simple terms, it means cranking up the body's calorie-burning abilities by weaving in near-constant movement, such as standing, walking, even pacing, at every opportunity. Becoming a body in motion that stays in motion could help you burn 500 or more extra calories a day. Combine that with smart food choices, and we could be well on our way to reversing the nation's ever-expanding waistline.

Levine, who is credited with coming up with the idea of the treadmill desk several years ago, said the best place to start is in the workplace.

If you're rolling your eyes, you might be guilty of what Levine calls "1930s thinking, to see employees (and the workplace) as merely tools of productivity." But "the really cool companies" — Google, Yahoo, Apple — "take the health and the happiness of their employees seriously," Levine said.

It's not just for altruistic reasons, of course. It's easier to keep health costs in line when employees are healthier, and a healthier workforce is a more productive workforce, he said. "A healthy workplace is the way of the future."

Such a future might resemble the headquarters of Stance, an upscale sock company that tailors its line to Southern California's snow, skate and surf culture.

CEO Jeff Kearl says the 4-year-old company, based in San Clemente, has spent more than $100,000 on employee perks such as a basketball court, a skateboard half-pipe, game tables and showers. A chef prepares healthful breakfasts and lunches. (On a recent Friday, employees rolled in to an array of freshly blended juices and homemade yogurt. Lunch revolved around a crunchy kale salad.) A gym, personal trainers and classes are coming shortly.

And it's not unusual for employees to clear out and head for the beach (just up the street) when the waves are just right.

"It may be hard for people to believe, but we have zero abuse," said Kearl, whose office runs by a "freedom and accountability" philosophy that loosely translates as: Just get your work done, okay?

Not every company is run like Kearl's, or will hire the likes of a Levine to revamp their culture and facilities to make health and fitness a priority. So we asked Levine to help us come up with some ideas to try now. For free. (See accompanying list.)

We realize all these ideas won't work for you.

But maybe a third of them will. And that would help you meet the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' recommendation that adults get at least 150 minutes a week of "moderate-intensity exercise."

Add a workout to your work routine

Looking to incorporate more movement into your workday? Taking the stairs or pacing while you're on the phone may be among the more obvious ideas, but there are plenty of other possibilities.

• Walk or bike to work once a week.

• Don't park your car in the spot closest to the front door. Instead, find the parking space farthest away. Of course, take safety and security into consideration.

• Stop the impulse to email. Instead, walk to a colleague's desk to deliver a work message.

• Walk for 15 minutes at lunch.

• Stand while you're reviewing your schedule for the day or reading paperwork.

• Need to catch up with a colleague to dissect a hot date? Do it over a walk, not at the water cooler.

Speaking of walking and gossiping, how about:

• Walk-and-talk meetings.

• Standing meetings.

• Create "walking trails" in your building. Mayo Clinic obesity expert Dr. James Levine suggests using colored duct tape and signs to let trail walkers know how far they've gone. (It's probably a good idea to clear this with management.)

• Relocate your mailbox to the opposite side of the building.

• Use the bathroom on the opposite side of the building.

• Same goes for the microwave.

• Ditto for the refrigerator.

• And the coffeemaker.

• And the trash can.

• Find a coffee spot that's a brisk 10-minute walk away. Make it a point to walk there three times a week.

• Bosses! Take your employees for coffee at the aforementioned coffee shop. Conduct a walk-and-talk meeting along the way.

• Challenge co-workers to get to 10,000 steps a day on their pedometer or fitness tracker.

• Grab your GPS and map out simple walking routes outside the office. Come up with a variety of distances. Create maps. Distribute.

• Leave your lunch in a cooler in your car and go retrieve it at lunchtime.

• After eating at your desk, walk the cooler back to the car.

• Or bring your cooler in when you arrive for work, then walk to a park to eat lunch.

• Consider the businesses within walking distance of your job. Can you get in some walking while knocking out errands at lunch?

• Set an alarm to go off every hour on the hour. When it does, get up and take a short, brisk stroll or stand and stretch — then get back to work.

Add a workout at your workplace

Looking to incorporate more movement into your workday? Taking the stairs or pacing while you're on the phone may be among the more obvious ideas, but there are plenty of other possibilities.

• Walk or bike to work once a week.

• Don't park your car in the spot closest to the front door. Instead, find the parking space farthest away. Of course, take safety and security into consideration.

• Stop the impulse to email. Instead, walk to a colleague's desk to deliver a work message.

• Walk for 15 minutes at lunch.

• Stand while you're reviewing your schedule for the day or reading paperwork.

• Need to catch up with a colleague to dissect a hot date? Do it over a walk, not at the water cooler.

Speaking of walking and gossiping, how about:

• Walk-and-talk meetings.

• Standing meetings.

• Create "walking trails" in your building. Mayo Clinic obesity expert Dr. James Levine suggests using colored duct tape and signs to let trail walkers know how far they've gone. (It's probably a good idea to clear this with management.)

• Relocate your mailbox to the opposite side of the building.

• Use the bathroom on the opposite side of the building.

• Same goes for the microwave.

• Ditto for the refrigerator.

• And the coffeemaker.

• And the trash can.

• Find a coffee spot that's a brisk 10-minute walk away. Make it a point to walk there three times a week.

• Bosses! Take your employees for coffee at the aforementioned coffee shop. Conduct a walk-and-talk meeting along the way.

• Challenge co-workers to get to 10,000 steps a day on their pedometer or fitness tracker.

• Grab your GPS and map out simple walking routes outside the office. Come up with a variety of distances. Create maps. Distribute.

• Leave your lunch in a cooler in your car and go retrieve it at lunchtime.

• After eating at your desk, walk the cooler back to the car.

• Or bring your cooler in when you arrive for work, then walk to a park to eat lunch.

• Consider the businesses within walking distance of your job. Can you get in some walking while knocking out errands at lunch?

• Set an alarm to go off every hour on the hour. When it does, get up and take a short, brisk stroll or stand and stretch — then get back to work.

Bit by bit, a more fit workplace 03/06/14 [Last modified: Thursday, March 6, 2014 5:32pm]
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