Thursday, July 19, 2018
Health

Candlelight vigil honors the victims of drug overdoses

TAMPA — Lynne Knowles suspected for months that something bad was going on with her daughter.

Jamie dozed off at odd hours, slept too much and woke up too early.

One day, Knowles came face-to-face with the truth.

She entered a Walgreens bathroom and found Jamie, who had just graduated from high school, preparing to stick a needle in her arm.

"I was in shock. I actually went screaming out to the pharmacists to call the police. I thought they could make her stop,'' Knowles said.

Jamie, who started abusing pain pills before her junior year of high school, died of a heroin overdose in 2012 at age 23.

Knowles, president of the Hillsborough Chapter of Narcotics Overdose Prevention & Education, or NOPE, spends much of her time these days trying to keep other students from starting down that deadly path.

She is one of the speakers scheduled to address the crowd at Hillsborough High School Thursday (Oct. 19) for the annual candlelight vigil memorializing victims of drug overdoses.

Participants will start gathering at 6 p.m. in the school's lobby, where more than 500 photographs of people who died of drug and alcohol abuse will be on display.

Friends and family members of those on the Memorial Wall are invited to write special messages to their loved ones.

"It honors not only the (victim) but also family members and friends,'' said Beth Butler, coordinator of the Hillsborough chapter of NOPE.

People concerned about the problem, along with those still actively struggling with addiction and people in recovery are invited, she said.

Butler, whose son is three years along in recovery from pain pill abuse, said that the stigma of addiction appears to be easing as more people come to realize that it is a disease and not the result of weak willpower.

NOPE's main mission is to reach out to middle and high school students with a powerful message delivered by friends and family members of victims, most of them caught up in the pain pill and heroin epidemic that has swept the nation.

"We know that we're affecting children; we know that we are helping them,'' Knowles said. "I know the presentation is powerful and moves children, and they do remember.''

She doesn't preach. She just explains what happened to her daughter and how devastating it was for her and the family. She tells about Jamie's life and reminds the audience that she now has only memories.

"I'll never hear her say, 'I love you, Mom,' ever again.''

And she tells them that two of Jamie's closest high school friends also died from overdoses.

Contact Philip Morgan at [email protected]

TAMPA — Lynne Knowles suspected for months that something bad was going on with her daughter.

Jamie dozed off at odd hours, slept too much and woke up too early.

One day, Knowles came face-to-face with the truth.

She entered a Walgreens bathroom and found Jamie, who had just graduated from high school, preparing to stick a needle in her arm.

"I was in shock. I actually went screaming out to the pharmacists to call the police. I thought they could make her stop,'' Knowles said.

Jamie, who started abusing pain pills before her junior year of high school, died of a heroin overdose in 2012 at age 23.

Knowles, president of the Hillsborough Chapter of Narcotics Overdose Prevention & Education, or NOPE, spends much of her time these days trying to keep other students from starting down that deadly path.

She is one of the speakers scheduled to address the crowd at Hillsborough High School Thursday (Oct. 19) for the annual candlelight vigil memorializing victims of drug overdoses.

Participants will start gathering at 6 p.m. in the school's lobby, where more than 500 photographs of people who died of drug and alcohol abuse will be on display.

Friends and family members of those on the Memorial Wall are invited to write special messages to their loved ones.

"It honors not only the (victim) but also family members and friends,'' said Beth Butler, coordinator of the Hillsborough chapter of NOPE.

People concerned about the problem, along with those still actively struggling with addiction and people in recovery are invited, she said.

Butler, whose son is three years along in recovery from pain pill abuse, said that the stigma of addiction appears to be easing as more people come to realize that it is a disease and not the result of weak willpower.

NOPE's main mission is to reach out to middle and high school students with a powerful message delivered by friends and family members of victims, most of them caught up in the pain pill and heroin epidemic that has swept the nation.

"We know that we're affecting children; we know that we are helping them,'' Knowles said. "I know the presentation is powerful and moves children, and they do remember.''

She doesn't preach. She just explains what happened to her daughter and how devastating it was for her and the family. She tells about Jamie's life and reminds the audience that she now has only memories.

"I'll never hear her say, 'I love you, Mom,' ever again.''

And she tells them that two of Jamie's closest high school friends also died from overdoses.

Contact Philip Morgan at [email protected]

Comments
Sarasota man dies from infectious bacteria after eating raw oysters

Sarasota man dies from infectious bacteria after eating raw oysters

A Sarasota man died of an infectious bacteria after eating raw oysters.The bacteria, called Vibrio vulnificus, is often associated with eating raw or under-cooked shellfish or entering into warm coastal waters with exposed wounds.The 71-year-old Sara...
Published: 07/18/18
Updated: 07/19/18
Soy, almond ‘milk’ don’t come from a cow, so they may soon be called ‘drinks’

Soy, almond ‘milk’ don’t come from a cow, so they may soon be called ‘drinks’

NEW YORK — Soy and almond drinks don’t come from cows, so regulators may soon ask them to stop calling themselves "milk." The Food and Drug Administration is signaling that it plans to start enforcing a federal standard that defines "milk" as coming ...
Published: 07/18/18
Florida nursing homes have enough staff, numbers show. But the state has shortages in other areas.

Florida nursing homes have enough staff, numbers show. But the state has shortages in other areas.

In most places across America, nursing homes are facing an acute shortage of workers to take care of the country’s growing population of aging and disabled patients. But not in Florida. A Kaiser Family Foundation report published this month found tha...
Published: 07/17/18
So far, so good. Doctors at Tampa General find success with a device that fights often-fatal aneurysms

So far, so good. Doctors at Tampa General find success with a device that fights often-fatal aneurysms

TAMPA — Dr. Murray Shames holds a flexible, lightweight tube as wide as two garden hoses pushed together in his office at Tampa General Hospital. The polyester tube, and its thinner fastening branches with metal wiring, will be attached inside someon...
Published: 07/13/18
Updated: 07/16/18
Sunday Conversation: Sherry Hoback looks to move Tampa Family Health Centers to the next level

Sunday Conversation: Sherry Hoback looks to move Tampa Family Health Centers to the next level

TAMPA — Taking over for an administrator who has run a company for almost 20 years can be daunting. • But Sherry Hoback prepared for some time to replace Charles Bottoms as CEO of the Tampa Family Health Centers, a non-profit organization that operat...
Published: 07/12/18
Updated: 07/15/18
How can City Hall improve our health? A new push in Pinellas hopes to show the way.

How can City Hall improve our health? A new push in Pinellas hopes to show the way.

The charitable organization that owns a 20 percent stake in St. Petersburg’s Bayfront Health hospital is working with local governments to improve the public’s health, part of a strategy to make a difference in new and often subtle ways. The Foundati...
Published: 07/11/18
Updated: 07/12/18
New York organ collection agency, nation’s second-largest, threatened with closure

New York organ collection agency, nation’s second-largest, threatened with closure

The government is threatening to close one of the country’s largest "organ procurement organizations" for poor performance, a rare move against a nonprofit group that collects kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs used in transplantation.In a lett...
Published: 07/11/18
Retirement communities turn their sights on a once-invisible group: LGBT seniors

Retirement communities turn their sights on a once-invisible group: LGBT seniors

In 2016, as Kenneth MacLean was about to turn 90 and was looking to move to a retirement community, he had a question for Asbury Methodist Village in Gaithersburg, Maryland."I asked, ‘Would there be many gays here? Would gays be welcomed?’ " MacLean,...
Published: 07/09/18
The other victims: First responders to horrific events often suffer in solitude

The other victims: First responders to horrific events often suffer in solitude

The day a gunman fired into a crowd of 22,000 people at the country music festival in Las Vegas, hospital nursing supervisor Antoinette Mullan was focused on one thing: saving lives.She recalls dead bodies on gurneys across the triage floor, a trauma...
Published: 07/09/18
Put your best feet forward with this health, footwear and beauty advice

Put your best feet forward with this health, footwear and beauty advice

All of a sudden, it’s hot and sunny everywhere — summer, officially — and even the shiest, palest, most woebegone toes are peeking out from their hiding places up North. They’ve been scrubbed and buffed, their nails clipped and polished. And they’re...
Published: 07/06/18