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Coffee struck from list of possible cancer-causing agents

Brown Coffee beans from above isolated on white background.

Brown Coffee beans from above isolated on white background.

LONDON — Go on, have another cup. Coffee is now off the list of things that could possibly cause cancer.

Experts convened by the World Health Organization's cancer research arm declared Wednesday that there isn't enough proof to show that the brew is linked to cancer. But in the same report, they warned that drinking "very hot" beverages of any kind could potentially raise your risk of the disease.

In particular, it cited countries including China, Iran and those in South America, where teas such as the bitter herbal infusion mate are traditionally drunk at extremely high temperatures — 150 or 160 degrees Fahrenheit — considerably hotter than drinks would normally be served in cafes across North America and Europe

Experts convened by WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded there was inadequate evidence to suggest that coffee might cause cancer, according to a letter published in the Lancet Oncology. The caffeinated drink was originally added to IARC's list of possible carcinogens in 1991 based on a small number of studies that suggested a possible link to bladder cancer.

"I'm not really sure why coffee was in a higher category in the first place," said Owen Yang, an epidemiologist at Oxford University who has previously studied the possible link between coffee and cancer. He was not part of the IARC expert group. "The best evidence available suggests that coffee does not raise the cancer risk," he said.

Drinking very hot beverages, however, just might.

Dana Loomis, deputy head of the IARC program that classifies carcinogens, said they began to look into a possible link after seeing unusually high rates of esophageal cancer in countries where drinking very hot beverages is common. He said that even at temperatures below 140 degrees Fahrenheit, hot beverages can scald the skin, and that consuming drinks at even higher temperatures could be harmful.

Loomis said very hot drinks might cause a "thermal injury" in the throat that could eventually promote the growth of tumors, but that evidence was limited. He said there wasn't enough data to suggest if eating very hot food might also be risky.

Coffee struck from list of possible cancer-causing agents 06/15/16 [Last modified: Wednesday, June 15, 2016 9:58pm]
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