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Florida Department of Health orders directors to bar Obamacare outreach workers from centers

The Florida Department of Health has become the latest arm of state government to distance itself from the federal Affordable Care Act. It has ordered county health units not to allow outreach workers called navigators onto their property to help uninsured people sign up for subsidized health coverage.

The order from C. Meade Grigg, deputy DOH secretary for statewide services, went out late Monday to the 60 local health department directors around the state. He wrote that the staff may accept informational materials from the navigators to hand out upon request.

"However, navigators will not conduct activities on the grounds of the health departments," Grigg wrote. He said the policy was developed after some had asked the DOH for permission to operate within state facilities, presumably because uninsured people often seek treatment there.

Dr. Marc Yacht, retired Pasco County health director, said the policy will "significantly compromise a multitude of needy Floridians from getting critical health care." He called it "cruel and irresponsible."

Grigg's note said the policy is consistent with requests from other groups in the past, which he did not name. The order makes an exception for federally qualified health centers that are operating within local health departments; 41 such clinics in Florida received $8.1 million in federal grants specifically to help uninsured patients enroll in a health plan.

The navigator program in Florida is being funded by $7.8 million in other federal grants, of which $4.2 million went to the Covering Kids & Families Program at the University of South Florida. USF is disbursing the money to 10 organizations around the state that will hire, train and supervise the outreach workers.

DOH spokeswoman Ashley Carr wrote the note was sent to provide "clarity" and "a consistent message.''

"Navigators are not acting on behalf of the Department of Health," Carr wrote, "and this program has raised privacy concerns due to the consumer information that will be gathered for use in a federal database."

This echoes remarks by Gov. Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty, all Republicans who have opposed the Affordable Care Act in the past. They have said they worried about the security of the health information.

But federal officials have said repeatedly that consumers will not be asked to provide personal health information to the marketplace, and that there will be no database of such information.

Florida Department of Health orders directors to bar Obamacare outreach workers from centers 09/11/13 [Last modified: Thursday, September 12, 2013 12:26pm]
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