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Gov. Rick Scott, other GOP governors want meeting with President Barack Obama on health care

TALLAHASSEE — Florida Gov. Rick Scott and 10 other Republican governors are asking to meet with President Barack Obama to discuss the impacts of the new health care law.

The letter, sent via the Republican Governors Association on Monday, was obtained exclusively by the Times/Herald and outlines the states' request for more control over their Medicaid programs.

"We request your personal commitment and follow-through from the United States Department of Health and Human Services to create flexibility and reforms to the program," the governors wrote. "While each state will have its own set of considerations regarding the future of its Medicaid program, our hope is that this letter can represent the first step in opening those discussions."

Among the other signees: Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer. They outline several suggestions about improving Medicaid, which provides insurance coverage for the needy and disabled.

The letter also outlines the governors' concerns with setting up health exchanges and enrolling people into Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Efforts to get the White House's reaction on the letter late Tuesday were unsuccessful.

Since the election, many Republican governors that had resisted implementing the health care law have begun using more cooperative language. But many say they have unanswered questions the government should address.

For example, Scott sent a letter to HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius two weeks ago asking to meet with her. In the letter, he mentions some of the same concerns that are in the letter to Obama. Scott's office said he has not received a response from Sebelius.

Gov. Rick Scott, other GOP governors want meeting with President Barack Obama on health care 12/04/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 10:03pm]
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