Wednesday, February 21, 2018
Health

Take our Times Summer Health Quiz

1. New sunscreen labeling guidelines are out, but one recommendation hasn't changed — do you know how often sunscreen should be applied?

A. Every half hour

B. Every two hours

C. Every six hours

Answer: B, every two hours, if you don't sweat or get wet; or immediately after going in the water or sweating heavily.

3. We recently reported (last week on this page) on deer ticks and Lyme disease, a serious health condition that often causes what hallmark symptoms?

A. Swelling and redness of the lips and ears

B. Bloodshot eyes and blurry vision

C. Bulls-eye shaped skin lesion and body aches

Answer: C, a bulls-eye shaped skin lesion, a red center and a clear area surrounded by a ring of red skin, and muscle and joint aches.

6. What place can become as hot as an oven in a matter of minutes on a sunny day and was a deathtrap for 32 U.S. children last year?

A. A driveway

B. A screened porch

C. The inside of a car

Answer: C, the inside of a car. The temperature can rise almost 30 degrees in 20 minutes, even with a window cracked. Young children can't cool themselves the way an adult can. Never leave a child in a car. Period.

12. Hurricane season is just around the corner. We all know to stock up on batteries, bottled water and peanut butter. But can you name at least three other important measures Floridians should take now to prepare?

Correct answers include: collect several extra days of prescription medications; stockpile any medical supplies or equipment necessary for your care including chargers, wires, tubing, testing supplies, etc.; register for a special needs shelter if you are disabled or have a medical condition that relies on electricity; arrange for the care of your pets if you live in an evacuation zone; gather important papers, files and personal documents and place them in sealed plastic bags where they are accessible; consider whether you need a generator for your home, boards for your windows or an extra fuel tank for outdoor grills.

Planning a big trip this summer or just a picnic at a local park? Whether your plans take you outdoors or out of town, there are some basic facts you should know to ensure your adventure doesn't end at the nearest hospital. And, that you're prepared for whatever Mother Nature sends our way.

Take our quiz to test your knowledge of summer safety tips.

1. New sunscreen labeling guidelines are out, but one recommendation hasn't changed — do you know how often sunscreen should be applied?

A. Every half hour

B. Every two hours

C. Every six hours

Answer: B, every two hours, if you don't sweat or get wet; or immediately after going in the water or sweating heavily.

2. How much sunscreen should you use?

A. enough to fill a shot glass

B. about a teaspoonful

C. a soda bottle cap full

Answer: A, an ounce, enough to fill a shot glass or a dollop the size of a golf ball.

3. We recently reported (last week on this page) on deer ticks and Lyme disease, a serious health problem that often causes what hallmark symptoms?

A. Swelling and redness of the lips and ears

B. Bloodshot eyes and blurry vision

C. Bulls-eye shaped skin lesion and body aches

Answer: C, a bulls-eye shaped skin lesion, a red center and a clear area surrounded by a ring of red skin, and muscle and joint aches.

4. How long does it take the tick to attach to your body and start spreading bacteria in your blood?

A. About 30 minutes

B. Up to 36 hours

C. More than 3 days

Answer: B, up to 36 hours, which is why you should check yourself for ticks immediately after walking in the woods or high grass.

5. What insect is a bigger threat than ticks to Floridians?

A. Mosquitoes

B. Wasps

C. Hornets

Answer: A, mosquitoes which carry West Nile virus and other potentially life-threatening diseases.

6. What place can become as hot as an oven in a matter of minutes on a sunny day and was a deathtrap for 32 U.S. children last year?

A. A driveway

B. A screened porch

C. The inside of a car

Answer: C, the inside of a car. The temperature can rise almost 30 degrees in 20 minutes, even with a window cracked. Young children can't cool themselves the way an adult can. Never leave a child in a car. Period.

7. What heat-related illness is a medical emergency and warrants a call to 911?

A. Heatstroke: skin dry, body temp high, victim confused.

B. Heat exhaustion: heavy sweating, nausea, headache.

C. Heat cramps: spasms, pain in arms, legs

Answer: A, heat stroke. Call 911, move person to shade, wet skin with cool water, give fluids, fan air. With heat exhaustion that doesn't improve within an hour, seek medical care.

8. How long is it safe to leave cold cuts, cheeses and condiments out for a buffet in your air conditioned home?

A. All day

B. 2 hours

C. 8-10 hours

Answer: B, two hours, after that microorganisms grow rapidly and can cause food borne illness.

9. What about at an outdoor picnic in Florida in June?

A. All day, as long as there's shade

B. Two hours

C. One hour

Answer: C, one hour is the limit when the air temperature indoors or outdoors is 90 degrees or above.

10. In short, the USDA advises keeping hot food hot and cold food cold. But do you know what that is on a food thermometer?

Answer: Hot food, 140 degrees or higher; cold food, 40 degrees or lower.

11. True or False? If you're at a city park and notice thunder and lightning, it's fine to stay under a picnic shelter until the storm passes.

Answer: False. Open sided shelters and gazebos designed to protect you from sun and rain showers may not protect you from lightning. Go to the nearest, largest, permanent, fully enclosed building or a vehicle. Keep all windows and doors closed. Wait 20 to 30 minutes after the last lightning flash or rumble of thunder to go back outside.

12. Hurricane season is just around the corner. We all know to stock up on batteries, bottled water and peanut butter. But can you name at least three other important measures Floridians should take now to prepare?

Correct answers include: collect several extra days of prescription medications; stockpile any medical supplies or equipment necessary for your care including chargers, wires, tubing, testing supplies, etc.; register for a special needs shelter if you are disabled or have a medical condition that relies on electricity; arrange for the care of your pets if you live in an evacuation zone; gather important papers, files and personal documents and place them in sealed plastic bags where they are accessible; consider whether you need a generator for your home, boards for your windows or an extra fuel tank for outdoor grills.

Sources: CDC, Harvard Medical School, The Weather Channel, San Francisco State University, USDA, Florida Dept. of Health.



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