Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Mosquito control officials: Even Zika suspicions are costly

MIAMI — Florida mosquito-control officials worry they won't be able to keep up their efforts to contain the bugs that carry Zika without federal funding, even as concern mounts that the first infection from a mosquito bite on the U.S. mainland is near.

On Thursday, fogging trucks drove through a Miami-Dade County neighborhood where health officials are investigating a Zika diagnosis that doesn't appear to be connected to travel outside the United States. Zika is usually spread by mosquitoes, but nearly all the cases in the United States have been contracted in other countries or through sex with someone who got it abroad.

The Florida Department of Health said Thursday another Zika case potentially not related to travel was being investigated in Broward County.

Meanwhile, the largest blood bank in Central Florida, OneBlood, said Thursday it is going to start screening for the Zika virus Aug. 1.

Dr. Rita Reik, OneBlood's chief medical officer, said in a statement that only a portion of collections will be screened. Hospitals and other facilities that want Zika-screened blood will have to make a request.

While Zika's appearance in mosquitoes in the U.S. mainland is likely, health officials don't expect widespread outbreaks like those seen in Latin America and the Caribbean. Zika is such a mild disease for most people that they don't even know they have it, but it has been found to lead to severe birth defects if a pregnant woman is infected.

The tropical mosquito that carries Zika, Aedes aegypti, likes to live near people and it doesn't travel far. More extensive use of air conditioning and window screens, wider use of bug repellent and broader mosquito-control measures will help control the spread of Zika by mosquitoes in the United States, experts think.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it has provided Florida $8 million in Zika-specific funding, and the White House has said the state can anticipate receiving another $5.6 million in Zika funding through a grant this week.

But the state hasn't been able to fill most of the $15 million in emergency Zika funding requests,

Mosquito control officials: Even Zika suspicions are costly 07/21/16 [Last modified: Thursday, July 21, 2016 8:50pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Review: Don't miss Israel Horovitz's 'Gloucester Blue' at Jobsite Theater

    Stage

    TAMPA — Sometimes a show comes along that does everything. It engages the senses on every level, tells a story that feels real, and keeps you guessing to the end.

    Ned Averill-Snell (left) plays Latham and Landon Green is Stumpy in Jobsite Theater's Gloucester Blue. Photo by Pritchard Photography.
  2. Hillsborough State Attorney Andrew Warren joins other prosecutors in protesting Jeff Sessions' 'tough-on-crime' policy

    Criminal

    TAMPA — Andrew Warren, the state attorney for Hillsborough County, is among signers of a letter from 31 district prosecutors nationwide voicing opposition to the tough-on-crime policies of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

    Hillsborough State Atttorney Andrew Warren is among the signers of a letter from 31 top prosecutors nationwide opposing Attorney General Jeff Sessions' 'tough-on-crime' policies. ANDRES LEIVA   |   Times
  3. Suspect tells police he killed Tampa Palms roommates for disrespecting his Muslim faith

    Crime

    TAMPA — A man accused of shooting his roommates in a New Tampa apartment told police he shared neo-Nazi beliefs with the two men until he converted to Islam then killed them because they disrespected his faith.

    Devon Arthurs, 18, of Tampa told police  he shared neo-Nazi beliefs with his roommates, Jeremy Himmelman and Andrew Oneschuk, until he converted to Islam and shot them because they disrespected his faith.
[Photo courtesy of Tampa Police]
  4. Nelson, Rubio want Trump to back off cuts to drug office

    Blogs

    Citing an opioid crisis “devastating Florida,” Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio are asking the Trump administration to back off plans to gut the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

    A letter to the Office of Management and Budget
  5. US President Donald Trump, left,  meets with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, Monday, in Jerusalem. Trump opened his first visit to Israel Monday, a two-day stop aimed at testing the waters for jumpstarting the dormant Middle East peace process. [AP photo]