Wednesday, February 21, 2018
Health

North Pinellas health news and notes for Jan. 19

To help Florida Hospital North Pinellas carry out is mission of providing faith-based, compassionate, quality health care to the community, the Helen Ellis Memorial Foundation has pledged $750,000 to the robotic assisted surgery program at the hospital. It will include the purchase of the da Vinci Surgical System.

Powered by state-of-the-art robotic technology, the system enables surgeons to perform delicate and complex operations through a few tiny incisions with increased vision, precision, dexterity and control.

"We are extremely proud to appropriate funds in support of Florida Hospital North Pinellas as they move to this state-of-the-art care for our community," said Terry Smither, executive director of the hospital foundation. "The foundation has already received a substantial donation from a generous foundation supporter that will go a long way in meeting this pledge."

Florida Hospital North Pinellas at 1395 S Pinellas Ave. in Tarpon Springs, is a member of the Florida Hospital network of the Adventist Health System, the largest health care provider in the state. Each year, the Florida Hospital network cares for nearly 1 million residents and visitors. The 168-bed, full-service hospital serves communities in Pinellas and Pasco counties.

• • •

Florida Hospital North Pinellas invites the community to a free neighborhood block party from 1 to 4 p.m. today on the hospital grounds.

The family-friendly event will feature activities for all ages, free health information and screenings, healthy cooking demonstrations, food samplings a Tampa Bay Buccaneer, Bucs cheerleaders and the team's mascot.

For more information visit youremergencycontact.org.

• • •

Need help navigating Medicare?

Meet with specially trained volunteers at a SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) Medicare program from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at East Lake Community Library, 4125 East Lake Road, for free, confidential and unbiased help with all Medicare questions, long-term care planning and prescription assistance resources.

Appointments are required. Call (727) 773-2665.

• • •

Blood cells are amazing. When working properly, white blood cells, or leukocytes, defend the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials. Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, are developed in bone marrow and are the principal means of delivering necessary oxygen to body tissue.

Join Dr. Ben Yan, oncologist, at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at the YMCA of the Suncoast, 1005 S Highland Ave. in Clearwater, as he reviews common conditions that affect the blood and bone marrow and may contribute to fatigue. Treatments available to improve fatigue caused by these conditions will also be discussed.

To register, call (727) 953-6877. Visit baycareevents.org.

• • •

Michael T. Murray, doctor of naturopathic medicine, will talk about how to manage stress, anxiety and insomnia naturally at a 6:30 p.m. seminar Wednesday at the Greektown Grille, 1230 Cleveland St. in Clearwater.

Murray is a product formulator for Natural Factors, a company that develops, formulates and manufactures nutritional supplements for the natural health store market.

Immediately following the lecture, a book signing will take place at Nature's Food Patch, 1225 Cleveland St.

Preregistration is required. Sign up at the Customer Care Center at Nature's Food Patch.

Call (727) 443-6703. Visit naturesfoodpatch.com

• • •

For people coping with life changes such as a new medical diagnosis, living with a chronic condition, seeking assistance to stay at home and manage an illness, caring for someone or grieving a loss, the Suncoast Hospice offers a surprising variety of services and programs.

The public is invited to learn about these available resources at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Safety Harbor Library, 101 Second St. N, Safety Harbor.

Call (727) 724-1525, ext. 4112. Visit safetyharborlibrary.com.

• • •

It's time again for the Hampton at Clearwater's annual health fair, "A Recipe For Better Health," from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at 1099 N McMullen-Booth Road in Clearwater.

The event includes: free health screenings for balance, blood pressure, vision, hearing and skin cancer; free nutrition information; cooking demonstrations; and free food samples. Memory testing, minimassages and information about a specialized telephone distribution program and related services for qualified Florida citizens will be available.

Admission is free.

Call (727) 726-8861.

Mail health news to Tampa Bay Times, 1130 Cleveland St., Suite 100-A, Clearwater, FL 33755; fax to (727) 445-4119; or email [email protected] tampabay.com.

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