Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Prominent USF-All Children's researcher leaving for Duke

Although USF and All Children’s signed an eight-year agreement extending their collaboration last year, Dr. John Sleasman said uncertainty persists. He’s leaving for a top position at the Duke University School of Medicine.

Lara Cerri | Times (2009)

Although USF and All Children’s signed an eight-year agreement extending their collaboration last year, Dr. John Sleasman said uncertainty persists. He’s leaving for a top position at the Duke University School of Medicine.

ST. PETERSBURG — A prominent University of South Florida pediatric immunologist who heads a research laboratory at All Children's Hospital is leaving for a top position at the Duke University School of Medicine.

Dr. John Sleasman's pending departure comes amid lingering questions about USF's future role at All Children's, which in 2011 became part of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Although USF and All Children's last year signed an eight-year agreement extending their longtime collaboration, Sleasman said uncertainty persists.

"The investigators who are here are feeling caught between the two institutions," said Sleasman. He holds the Robert A. Good chair in immunology, which is jointly funded by USF and All Children's. Outside universities — in his case, Duke — have come recruiting amid that uncertainty.

Two other USF pediatric immunologists, Drs. Elena Perez and Morna Dorsey, left for the University of Miami and the University of California at San Francisco, respectively, he said.

Sleasman, who starts his new job in October, has been the medical director of the Children's Research Institute's Immunodiagnostics Laboratory at All Children's for more than a decade. USF Health officials say his departure won't affect other programs at the university's Children's Research Institute, located in the building known for the giant Band-Aid sculpture by James Rosenquist on the outside.

But when he goes to Duke, so do the federal grants awarded to him as principal researcher, funds that have covered salaries for the half-dozen staffers working with him.

Dr. Patricia Emmanuel, chairwoman of USF's Department of Pediatrics, said she too had worried about USF's role at All Children's after the pediatric hospital joined forces with Johns Hopkins. But she said the agreement hammered out last year reflects a strong commitment on both sides.

The agreement reaffirms that USF medical students and residents in surgical specialties can continue to train at All Children's. It also says research collaboration between the two will continue and expand.

"We spent a lot of time last year working on that relationship," Emmanuel said. "I feel a lot more confident now."

All Children's spokeswoman Cindy Rose said the agreement with USF establishes new ventures, including the addition of two endowed chairs. "I believe our relationship with USF is stronger than ever, and it continues to grow and flourish," she said.

USF must decide what to do with the employees working with Sleasman. "We want to retain these highly trained technicians," Emmanuel said.

She also said USF and All Children's will begin recruiting for the Robert A. Good chair, which honors the late pioneer in immunology and bone marrow transplantation. She added that USF hopes to continue the work in the diagnostics lab, though she could not yet say how.

Jodie Tillman can be reached at [email protected] or (813) 226-3374.

Prominent USF-All Children's researcher leaving for Duke 07/24/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 10:36pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Daniel Ruth: Advice for sniping school board members — Grow up or go away

    Columns

    There are certain jobs in elective office that carry with them a slightly higher expectation when it comes to how one behaves in public.

    Hillsborough School Board members Tamara Shamburger, above, and April Griffin started off the brouhaha at a recent training session but it didn't end there. [Courtesy of Tamara Shamburger]
  2. What you need to know about Clearwater's $55 million waterfront plan

    Growth

    CLEARWATER — It's the most aggressive revitalization investment the city has proposed in years and somewhat of a Hail Mary strategy to give visitors a daily reason to come downtown. The $55 million Imagine Clearwater plan unveiled in February calls for reshaping Coachman Park and the waterfront to have more …

    Renderings of the city's $55 million Imagine Clearwater waterfront redevelopment plan show the goal for the redeveloped waterfront. Much of the plan hinges on voters passing a Nov. 7 referendum question, which would allow for development on the Bluff.

  3. Orionid meteor shower peaks this weekend across Tampa Bay (w/ video)

    Weather

    The sky is going to put on quite a show the next couple of nights.

    The annual Opionid meteor shower can be seen in the night sky in the months of October and November. [Screengrab via video]
  4. Philanthropist Helen DeVos, wife of Orlando Magic owner and mother of Betsy, dies at 90

    Obituaries

    GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Helen J. DeVos, a philanthropist from western Michigan known for her support of children's health, Christian education and the arts, has died at age 90, her family said Thursday.

    Orlando Magic owner Rich DeVos, left, waves to fans while watching court side with his wife, Helen, during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls in Orlando. The family of Helen DeVos said the philanthropist from western Michigan known for her support of children's health, Christian education and the arts has died. She was 90. Her family said she died Wednesday, Oct. 18, of complications from a stroke following a recent diagnosis of myeloid leukemia. [Associated Press]
  5. Authorities: A man named 'Cabbage' sold soap, not cocaine, to undercover detective

    Public Safety

    CLEARWATER

    Authorities: A man named 'Cabbage' sold soap, not cocaine, to undercover detective