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Study: Antidepressant may cut Alzheimer's protein

WASHINGTON — Research shows a common antidepressant may cut production of one of the chief suspects behind Alzheimer's, a new avenue in the hunt for drugs to prevent the devastating brain disease.

It's far too early for anyone worried about dementia to try the drug citalopram, which sells as the brand Celexa — and comes with side effects.

"This is not the great new hope. This is a small step," cautioned Dr. Yvette Sheline of the University of Pennsylvania, who is leading the research with Dr. John Cirrito of Washington University in St. Louis.

Alzheimer's is characterized by sticky plaques that form in patients' brains 10 to 15 years before the first memory symptoms are noticed. Scientists have tried treatments to clear away those plaques, made of a protein named beta-amyloid that somehow goes awry and starts clumping together, but with no success yet.

Wednesday's study is a somewhat different approach, beginning to explore if it's possible to slow the plaque from building up by altering the body's production of amyloid.

First, researchers gave citalopram to older mice with Alzheimer's-like brain damage. The animals' existing plaques didn't go away but they quit growing — and dramatically fewer new plaques formed compared with mice given sugar water, the research team reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Next, researchers gave a single dose of citalopram or a placebo to 23 healthy young adults, people who neither were depressed nor old enough to have brain plaques. Tests of the volunteers' spinal fluid over the next day and a half showed their normal amyloid production dropped by 37 percent, the researchers reported.

It will take years of additional research to tell if that translates into any protective effect.

Study: Antidepressant may cut Alzheimer's protein 05/14/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 14, 2014 10:20pm]
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