Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Two local nursing homes land on federal watch list

Two Tampa Bay area nursing homes have landed on a federal list of problem facilities. They risk losing their Medicare and Medicaid privileges if they don't shape up.

Recent inspections and complaint investigations have revealed a host of problems at Lakeshore Villas Health Care Center in Tampa and South Heritage Health & Rehabilitation Center in St. Petersburg. Each was recently designated a "special focus facility" by the agency that administers government health programs for the elderly and the poor.

Special focus facilities are those found to have more numerous and serious problems than other nursing homes. They are inspected twice as often as other homes, about twice a year, and must remain problem-free for 18 to 24 months to "graduate" from the program.

Lakeshore Villas, a 179-bed nonprofit nursing home at 16002 Lakeshore Villa Drive, was cited for violations including its handling of a resident who fondled another resident three times last year.

A complaint investigation last October found that the facility "failed to protect all residents from known inappropriate behaviors" of the resident. The facility was supposed to monitor the problem resident and keep him or her away from others. But state inspectors found no documentation showing that law enforcement had been contacted, or how residents were being protected.

The state also fined the home $43,500 for its handling of the incident.

Since the investigation, the problem resident was discharged and staff was trained on the proper way to handle such situations.

The nursing home's administrator, Christina Johnson, did not return a message seeking comment Thursday.

South Heritage Health, a 74-bed nonprofit nursing home at 718 Lakeview Ave. S in St. Petersburg, was cited in October for not having a system to identify residents with food allergies. In one case, inspectors found that a tuna sandwich was served to a resident who was allergic to tuna, and that resident then experienced chest pain.

The home quickly submitted a correction plan, and there have been no problems since, facility spokesman Tom Groesbeck said in a statement Thursday. He pointed out that the facility is already in a category of homes on the federal list that are showing improvement.

South Heritage is "confident they will continue to improve. Their focus continues to be on providing quality care to their patients and residents," he said in the statement.

Two other area nursing homes remain on the federal list — Palm Terrace of St. Petersburg and Bayonet Point Health & Rehabilitation Center in Hudson. The only other Florida home currently on the list is in Fort Pierce, on the east coast.

Richard Martin can be reached at rmartin@tampabay.com or (813) 226-3322.

Two local nursing homes land on federal watch list 05/31/12 [Last modified: Thursday, May 31, 2012 9:44pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. What you need to know for Thursday, Oct. 19

    News

    Catching you up on overnight happenings, and what you need to know today

    White nationalist Richard Spencer is scheduled to speak at the University of Florida tonight and the school is on high alert for tensions. [Associated Press]
  2. Bowen: Park land deal raises Penny for Pasco questions

    Environment

    The Penny for Pasco is unambiguous.

    At least it is supposed to be.

    There was no equivocating in 2004 when Penny for Pasco supporters detailed how the sales tax proceeds would be spent: schools, transportation, public safety and environmental lands. No money for parks. No money for recreation.

    Pasco County is considering a loan from its Environmental Lands Acquisition and Mangement Program to buy land for a park in the Villages of Pasadena Hills in east-central Pasco. Shown here is the Jumping Gully Preserve in Spring Hil, acquired by ELAMP in 2009 and 2011.
[Douglas R. Clifford, Times]
  3. Another Tampa Bay agency loses tax credits worth millions in dispute over application error

    News

    LARGO — Another Tampa Bay housing agency has lost out on a multi-million dollar tax credit award because of problems with its application.

    A duplex in Rainbow Village, a public housing complex in Largo. The Pinellas County Housing Authority is planning to build new affordable-housing in the complex but was recently disqualified from a state tax credit award because of an issue with its application.
  4. Live blog: Many unknowns as Richard Spencer speaks in Gainesville today

    College

    GAINESVILLE — A small army of law enforcement officers, many of them from cities and counties around the state, have converged on the University of Florida in preparation for today's speaking appearance by white nationalist Richard Spencer.

    Florida Highway Patrol cruisers jammed the parking lot Wednesday at the Hilton University of Florida Conference Center in Gainesville, part of a big show of force by law enforcement ahead of Thursday's appearance by white nationalist Richard Spencer. [KATHRYN VARN | Times]
  5. As Clearwater Marine Aquarium expands, it asks the city for help

    Growth

    CLEARWATER — When Clearwater Marine Aquarium CEO David Yates saw an architect's initial design for the facility's massive expansion project, he told them to start all over.

    Clearwater Marine Aquarium Veterinarian Shelly Marquardt (left), Brian Eversole, Senior Sea Turtle and Aquatic Biologist (middle) and Devon Francke, Supervisor of Sea Turtle Rehab, are about to give a rescued juvenile green sea turtle, suffering from a lot of the Fibropapillomatosis tumors, fluids at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium Wednesday afternoon. Eventually when the turtle is healthy enough the tumors will be removed with a laser and after it is rehabilitated it will be released back into the wild.  -  The Clearwater Marine Aquarium is launching a $66 million renovation to expand its facilities to take in injured animals and space to host visitors. The aquarium is asking the city for a $5 million grant Thursday to help in the project. American attitudes toward captive animals are changing. Sea World is slipping after scrutiny on the ethics of captive marine life. But CEO David Yates says CMA is different, continuing its mission of rehab and release, it's goal is to promote education, not exploitation. JIM DAMASKE   |   Times