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U.S. launches new batch of graphic anti-smoking ads

This image provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a poster from their anti-smoking advertising campaign, launched on Thursday. It features Terrie, who lost her voice box to smoking. The 16-week campaign costs $48 million.

Associated Press

This image provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a poster from their anti-smoking advertising campaign, launched on Thursday. It features Terrie, who lost her voice box to smoking. The 16-week campaign costs $48 million.

NEW YORK — Government health officials launched the second round of a graphic ad campaign Thursday that is designed to get smokers off tobacco, saying they think the last effort convinced tens of thousands to quit.

The ads feature sad, real-life stories: There is Terrie, a North Carolina woman who lost her voice box. Bill, a diabetic smoker from Michigan who lost his leg. And Aden, a 7-year-old boy from New York, who has asthma attacks from secondhand smoke.

"Most smokers want to quit. These ads encourage them to try," said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The 16-week CDC campaign costs $48 million and includes TV, radio and online spots as well as print ads and billboards.

The spending comes as the agency is facing a tough budget squeeze, but officials say the ads should more than pay for themselves by averting future medical costs to society. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable illness and death in the United States. It's responsible for the majority of the nation's lung cancer deaths and is a deadly factor in heart attacks and a variety of other illnesses.

Last year's similar $54 million campaign was the agency's first and largest national advertising effort. The government deemed it a success: That campaign triggered an increase of 200,000 calls to quit lines. The CDC thinks that likely prompted tens of thousands of smokers to quit based on calculations that a certain percentage of callers actually stop.

The ads direct people to call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

U.S. launches new batch of graphic anti-smoking ads 03/28/13 [Last modified: Thursday, March 28, 2013 10:18pm]
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