Sunday, April 22, 2018
Health

USF names new medical school dean

TAMPA — An internationally recognized researcher in obstetrics and gynecology has been named dean of the University of South Florida's Morsani School of Medicine.

Dr. Charles Lockwood, 59, is currently dean of Ohio State University College of Medicine and member of the prestigious Institute of Medicine.

"I can't wait to get started," Lockwood told reporters on Thursday.

He replaces former USF medical school dean Stephen Klasko, who left last year after nearly a decade at the helm to become president of Thomas Jefferson University and chief executive officer of the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital System in Philadelphia.

Lockwood, who will also serve as senior vice president for USF Health, starts his new job on May 5. His 12-month salary will be $775,000. He receives a one-time startup bonus of $80,000 and is eligible for a performance bonus of $155,000.

When Klasko left last year, he was in the midst of a five-year contract that paid him $748,000 a year and included a $100,000 signing bonus. He lost out on roughly $1.6 million in deferred retention incentives by leaving early.

Ohio State's medical school has its own hospital, something USF lacks despite Klasko's best efforts. But Lockwood said Thursday that USF's partnership with Tampa General Hospital makes the most sense in today's "tumultuous" economy for hospitals.

"There's a curse and a blessing to having your own hospital," he said. "On the whole, I think partnering with a hospital in this day and age is preferable to owning one."

When Lockwood takes the helm at USF, he'll face the ambitious legacy of his controversial predecessor. Klasko forged unlikely partnerships, such as with Lakeland Regional Medical Center, and embarked on wide-ranging ventures, from a $40 million training center in downtown Tampa to a new heart institute.

Lockwood did not speak directly on any of those projects. He said he was attracted to USF because of its emphasis on innovative research, particularly if its results can be patented and commercialized to generate revenue. Continuing to look for such opportunities, he said, is critical as federal government research funding grows more scarce.

Lockwood said he was impressed by the enthusiasm he saw at USF despite the many financial challenges present in academic medicine. "I was really stunned at how energized, enthusiast and optimistic they are," he said.

Though USF hired a search firm to help find a dean, the other candidates were internal: Dr. Charles Paidas, vice dean for clinical affairs and graduate medical education; Dr. David J. Smith Jr., chairman of the surgery department; Dr. Robert Brooks, associate vice president for health care leadership; Dr. Stephen Liggett, associate vice president for personalized medicine; and Dr. Clifton Gooch, chairman of the neurology department, who later withdrew from consideration.

Before joining Ohio State in 2011, Lockwood spent nine years as chairman of the obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences department at Yale University School of Medicine. Before his Yale post, he was department chairman at New York University School of Medicine and served as acting director of NYU's Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer Center. His previous appointments include the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and the faculty of Tufts University.

Lockwood earned his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and he has a master's degree in health care management from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served his residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital and his fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the Yale-New Haven Hospital.

Lockwood's research in obstetrics and gynecology has garnered multiple awards, particularly for his work in premature births. His clinical interests include the prevention of recurrent pregnancy loss, preterm delivery and maternal thrombosis. He was part of a research team credited with developing "fetal fibronectin," the first biochemical predictor of prematurity.

"The University of South Florida System is thrilled to welcome an individual of Dr. Lockwood's national standing to lead USF Health as we continue to provide leading-edge health education and care," USF president Judy Genshaft said in a statement.

Jodie Tillman can be reached at [email protected] or (813) 226-3374.

Comments
Do not eat any romaine lettuce, the CDC warns

Do not eat any romaine lettuce, the CDC warns

Public health officials are now telling consumers to avoid all types of romaine lettuce because of an E. coli outbreak linked to the vegetable that has spread to at least 16 states and sickened at least 60 people, including eight inmates at an Alask...
Published: 04/20/18
Florida hits a milestone: More than 100,000 people are registered to use medical marijuana here

Florida hits a milestone: More than 100,000 people are registered to use medical marijuana here

Florida has hit a milestone of sorts as it slowly moves toward wider availability of medical marijuana.The number of patients in the state who are registered to use the substance has surpassed 100,000 for the first time, according to Florida Departme...
Published: 04/20/18
Florida Hospital Carrollwood spending $17.5 million to expand emergency department

Florida Hospital Carrollwood spending $17.5 million to expand emergency department

Florida Hospital Carrollwood is expanding its emergency department. The hospital, 7171 North Dale Mabry Highway in Tampa, is spending $17.5 million to add 15 new private treatment rooms, new pediatric rooms and waiting areas, and new technology, acco...
Published: 04/18/18
Barbara Bush’s end-of-life decision stirs debate over ‘comfort care’

Barbara Bush’s end-of-life decision stirs debate over ‘comfort care’

As she nears death at age 92, former first lady Barbara Bush’s announcement that she is seeking "comfort care" is shining a light — and stirring debate — on what it means to stop trying to fight terminal illness.Bush, the wife of former President Geo...
Published: 04/17/18
Preparing for the worst, staffers at Johns Hopkins All Children’s learn through simulation

Preparing for the worst, staffers at Johns Hopkins All Children’s learn through simulation

When the patient got violent, Dr. Michelle Hidalgo didn’t have time to think. She had to react. The woman was moving strangely and seemed erratic. Hidalgo had to make a tough call — it was time to physically restrain her for everyone’s safety.Then th...
Published: 04/16/18
Updated: 04/17/18

Lung cancer patients live longer with immune therapy

The odds of survival can greatly improve for people with the most common type of lung cancer if, along with the usual chemotherapy, they are also given a drug that activates the immune system, a major new study has shown.The findings should change me...
Published: 04/16/18
Thousands of pounds of prepackaged salad mixes may have been tainted with E. coli, officials say

Thousands of pounds of prepackaged salad mixes may have been tainted with E. coli, officials say

A Pennsylvania food manufacturer is recalling 8, 757 pounds of ready-to-eat salad products following an E. coli outbreak that has spread to several states and sickened dozens of people.Fresh food Manufacturing Co., based in Freedom, Pennsylvania, is ...
Published: 04/15/18
St. Anthony’s Cancer Center installs bell dedicated to survivors

St. Anthony’s Cancer Center installs bell dedicated to survivors

ST. PETERSBURGSister Mary McNally, vice president of mission at St. Anthony’s Hospital, stood in front of a room of cancer survivors to unveil a silver bell surrounded by butterfly stickers mounted to the wall of the Cancer Center lobby. "So often pe...
Published: 04/13/18
Hand dryers could leave your hands dirtier than you think

Hand dryers could leave your hands dirtier than you think

Washing your hands after you use the bathroom is a good idea. But using a public dryer could undo all that hard work, according to a new study.A study, published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, examined 36 men’s and women’s bat...
Published: 04/13/18
Meek and Mighty Triathlon draws the young (siblings who are 7, 9 and 11) and not so young

Meek and Mighty Triathlon draws the young (siblings who are 7, 9 and 11) and not so young

The annual St. Anthony’s Triathlon has for years attracted elite athletes from around the world, making the St. Petersburg race one of the premier triathlon events in the country. There’s a big incentive to run fast, swim hard and be the best on a bi...
Published: 04/13/18