Friday, December 15, 2017
Health

Zika Q&A: What you need to know now that a locally transmitted case is in Pinellas County

On the heels of Tuesday's announcement of a locally transmitted Zika case in Pinellas County, here are answers to some of your questions:

What is Zika? How is it spread?

Zika is a virus primarily spread by the Aedes genus of mosquito, which usually bites during the day. Mosquitoes become infected when they bite a person infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

The virus can be spread through sex, from a pregnant woman to her fetus, or potentially via blood transfusion, although this last method has not yet been confirmed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The mosquitoes typically lay eggs in and near standing water in things like buckets, flower pots, trash can lids, animal dishes and in plants such as bromeliads.

As of Tuesday, 42 Zika cases have been reported in Florida and more than 2,200 in the United States. Another 8,035 cases have been reported in U.S. territories, mainly in Puerto Rico.

What health problems can Zika cause?

Zika can cause severe brain defects in a fetus, a condition known as microcephaly, that results in a baby being born with an unusually small head and a brain that may not be fully developed, along with vision, hearing and growth problems.

CDC research also shows a strong link between Zika and a disease of the nervous system called Guillain-Barré syndrome, but only a small percentage of people with Zika develop GBS.

RELATED COVERAGE: Gov. Rick Scott confirms non-travel Zika virus case in Pinellas County

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Mutant mosquitoes could fight Zika in Florida, but misinformation spreads

Who is most at risk?

Pregnant women: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has concluded that if a pregnant woman contracts the Zika virus, she can transfer the virus to her fetus and run the risk of her baby being born with microcephaly, a birth defect where a baby's head is smaller than expected.

Babies born with microcephaly often have smaller brains that may not have developed fully. Babies also can have problems with seizures, feeding, intellectual disability, hearing loss, vision problems and issues with movement and balance.

As of Aug. 11, there were 529 pregnant women in the United States, including the District of Columbia, who had lab evidence of the Zika virus, according to the CDC.

Another 691 pregnant women in U.S. territories, primarily in Puerto Rico, have tested positive for Zika.

How can I get tested for Zika?

A blood or urine test can confirm a diagnosis of Zika.

The Florida Department of Health in Pinellas County is providing no-cost Zika testing to pregnant women, Scott said. You can reach the department at (727) 824-6900.

You can also get tested from a private lab, although that can cost between $165 and $500. Contact your health care provider.

The blood samples are sent to a state lab for testing, which can take from one to three weeks for the results.

Pregnant women who have recently visited Wynwood or Miami Beach should get tested immediately. As per the CDC warning, pregnant women who have frequented these areas should be tested in their first and second trimesters.

Should pregnant women travel to areas where Zika has been confirmed?

No. Pregnant women should not travel to any area with Zika. The first case of mosquito-borne Zika locally was just announced in Pinellas County.

Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties are other areas in the continental United States where mosquitoes have infected people with Zika. Most of the cases stem from Wynwood.

On Aug. 1, the CDC advised pregnant woman to avoid Wynwood, marking the first time the CDC has warned against travel to any area within the continental United States. On Aug. 19, CDC Director Tom Freiden said pregnant women should avoid South Beach and "consider postponing all non-essential travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County.''

What are the symptoms of Zika?

Many people who are infected with Zika won't have symptoms or will have mild symptoms. Symptoms include fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis, muscle pain and headaches.

Symptoms can last for several days up to a week. Once a person has been infected with Zika, they are likely to be protected from future infections.

People usually don't get sick enough to go the hospital.

There is no specific medicine for treating Zika. Rest, drink lots of fluids and take Tylenol to reduce fever and pain. Do not take aspirin or other anti-inflammatory drugs — Advil, Motrin, Aleve — which can cause bleeding.

How can I prevent sexual transmission of Zika?

If you have traveled to an area with Zika and have symptoms or were diagnosed with Zika, do the following:

If you are pregnant, use condoms every time you have sex.Zika can be transmitted through vaginal, anal, oral sex and the sharing of sex toys.

Couples trying to become pregnant should wait at least eight weeks after possible exposure before having sex. They should also talk to their health care provider to determine their risks.

Men who have a confirmed Zika infection should wait at least six months after symptoms before having sex or use a condom. Women who have a confirmed Zika infection should wait at least eight weeks before having sex, or have their partner use a condom.

What can I do to protect myself and my family?

Take it from the CDC: "The best way to prevent Zika is to prevent mosquito bites."

Pregnant women and women who are breastfeeding should use insect repellent with DEET and Picaridin.

To help fight mosquitoes generally, drain and cover any standing water on your property, use insect repellent and wear long-sleeved clothing and long pants.

Pinellas County residents who want to report a mosquito issue should call the state's Zika hotline at (855) 622-6735.

St. Petersburg residents may use the city's online code violation tool, SeeClickFix, to report standing water that might attract mosquitoes. Google it or get the app.

So, what do I need to know about the Aedes aegyptai mosquito?

Its life cycle is about 8-10 days long, and females are the biters.

The mosquito loves clean, standing water and will only fly a few hundred feet in its life.

Aedes aegyptai females are attracted to human odor and sweat.

Where does this mosquito reside?

The Aedes mosquito lives across a large swath of the United States, as shown by this map: tbtim.es/15fs.

When did Zika get to South Florida? How many people have it?

The first local cases were reported by the Health Department in late July. Most of the cases have stemmed from people getting bitten by mosquitoes in Wynwood; on Friday, Aug. 19, state health officials announced that five of those cases stemmed from people getting bitten by mosquitoes in South Beach.

How long has Zika been around?

It was first identified in Uganda in 1947.

Since May 2015, Brazil has experienced a significant outbreak of Zika cases. Brazilian officials reported an increase in the number of babies born with microcephaly.

The CDC notes previous outbreaks in may have gone unreported because the symptoms can mirror those of other diseases.

Can pesticides cause microcephaly?

Read what the CDC has to say on this: "Recent media reports have suggested that a pesticide called pyriproxyfen might be linked with microcephaly. Pyriproxyfen has been approved for the control of disease-carrying mosquitoes by the World Health Organization. Pyriproxyfen is a registered pesticide in Brazil and other countries, it has been used for decades, and it has not been linked with microcephaly. In addition, exposure to pyriproxyfen would not explain recent study results showing the presence of Zika virus in the brains of babies born with microcephaly.''

The Tampa Bay Times and Miami Herald contributed to this report.

Comments
Obamacare enrollment ends today, but some can get an extension

Obamacare enrollment ends today, but some can get an extension

Today is the day that open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act will close for most people. But those affected by the slew of hurricanes that pummelled Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and other states earlier this year can take advantage of a two-week ...
Published: 12/15/17
City Council sinks deal to alter ownership of Bayfront Health St. Petersburg

City Council sinks deal to alter ownership of Bayfront Health St. Petersburg

ST. PETERSBURG — After months of tense negotiations and weeks of political impasse, the City Council on Thursday derailed a proposal that would have changed the ownership structure of the city’s largest hospital, Bayfront Health St. Petersburg.The 5-...
Published: 12/14/17
Florida hospitals call for more funding in effort to address looming doctor shortage

Florida hospitals call for more funding in effort to address looming doctor shortage

The number of doctors practicing in Florida has not kept up with the state’s surging population growth, and more money is needed to recruit and keep them here, hospital leaders said Wednesday.The shortage is particularly acute in four speciality area...
Published: 12/13/17
An overlooked epidemic: Older Americans taking too many unneeded drugs

An overlooked epidemic: Older Americans taking too many unneeded drugs

Consider it America’s other prescription drug epidemic.For decades, experts have warned that older Americans are taking too many unnecessary drugs, often prescribed by multiple doctors, for dubious or unknown reasons. Researchers estimate that 25 per...
Published: 12/13/17
How is Florida’s health? Not so great, report says

How is Florida’s health? Not so great, report says

Florida slightly improved its national standing this year, rising from 36th to 32nd overall in the annual America’s Health Rankings report. But the takeaway for the nation’s third-largest state is that it has a long way to go in many important health...
Published: 12/12/17
Driven by demand, Planned Parenthood opens second clinic in Tampa

Driven by demand, Planned Parenthood opens second clinic in Tampa

The floor-to-ceiling glass windows are heavily tinted and the inside is hidden behind rows of curtains. Security cameras monitor every corner, and only patients with an appointment and valid identification can pass through the intentionally cramped e...
Published: 12/12/17
Video: Jimmy Kimmel holds his baby son, post-heart surgery, in emotional health-care monologue

Video: Jimmy Kimmel holds his baby son, post-heart surgery, in emotional health-care monologue

Jimmy Kimmel was absent from his ABC late-night show last week while his 8-month-old son, Billy, recovered from his second heart surgery. Ever since Billy was born with a heart defect and required immediate surgery, Kimmel has become an outspoken adv...
Published: 12/12/17
Record numbers are signing up for Obamacare in Florida as enrollment period draws to a close

Record numbers are signing up for Obamacare in Florida as enrollment period draws to a close

With just four days left to enroll for health insurance on the federal exchange, advocates for the Affordable Care Act say Florida is headed for a record-breaking year. In week five of the six-week open enrollment period, about 823,180 people signed ...
Published: 12/12/17
A boy shares the pain of being bullied - inspiring thousands to show him love (w/video)

A boy shares the pain of being bullied - inspiring thousands to show him love (w/video)

While fighting back tears, young Keaton Jones couldn’t stop asking one question: Why?"Just out of curiosity, why do they bully? What’s the point of it?" he asks his mother while in the passenger seat of a parked car. "Why do you find joy in taking in...
Published: 12/10/17
Updated: 12/11/17
Legalization of marijuana for adults poses problems for people dealing with teens

Legalization of marijuana for adults poses problems for people dealing with teens

WESTMINSTER, Calif. — After Yarly Raygoza attended the drug prevention program at the Boys & Girls Club here last year, she used what she learned to talk a few friends out of using marijuana.The 14-year-old took the class again this year but worries ...
Published: 12/10/17