Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Dunedin gears up for first gay pride festival

DUNEDIN — Local organizers hope the city's first gay pride festival this weekend will attract a big crowd — and big business.

Between today and Sunday, North Pinellas Pride will invite visitors to span the city's downtown and waterfront for events tailored to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities.

Festival coordinator Glen Bechara said organizers are planning for up to 5,000 visitors for the weekend.

"This is a great chance for the community to get together and have a good time," Bechara said. "We've got a strong presence in south Pinellas and a strong presence in Tampa. … We want to show that North Pinellas has pride, too."

The festival falls between two similar celebrations: the Reel Pride film festival last weekend in New Port Richey, and the St. Pete Pride festival that starts next week. St. Petersburg's festival is the largest of its kind in the state, drawing 80,000 visitors last year.

Supporters hope this weekend's festival will share in that success, citing the city's relaxed reputation for LGBT rights. Dunedin is the only city in Pinellas County, besides Gulfport, to have passed an ordinance protecting against discrimination of gender identity or expression, and city employees can share employment benefits with partners of the same sex.

The festival begins Friday with a 5 p.m. poolside reception and Drag Queen Bingo at the Beso del Sol Resort. At 8 p.m., organizers will screen Wigstock: The Movie, a documentary on a drag music festival in New York City's East Village, at the Dunedin Community Center.

On Saturday, visitors will meet at a Honeymoon Island pavilion, attend a pool party at the resort and play games of "gay bowling" at Dunedin Lanes.

On Sunday, the festival will showcase live music for a family-friendly gathering at Highlander Park. Each night of the festival ends with a dance show at Blur, a gay nightclub on Main Street.

. Fast facts

If you go

Today's welcome reception runs from 5 to 7 p.m. at 1420 Bayshore Blvd., costing $5 for visitors not staying at the Beso del Sol Resort.

For more information, visit www.NorthPinellasPride.com.

Dunedin gears up for first gay pride festival 06/17/10 [Last modified: Thursday, June 17, 2010 7:55pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Waiting for the eclipse: 'Everyone thinks this is cool'

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Hunter Holland came to school Monday with a NASA space T-shirt and solar viewers in his button-up shirt pocket. But he'd rather be in Missouri.

    Paxson Evans, 4, views the solar eclipse Monday with his parents Jen DesRuisseau and Arom Evans at Shorecrest Preparatory School in St. Petersburg. [COLLEEN WRIGHT | Times]
  2. Second person resigns from Hillsborough diversity council after Confederate activist appointed

    Blogs

    TAMPA — A second person has resigned symbolically from the Hillsborough County Diversity Advisory Council after the appointment of a known activist of Confederate causes to the panel. 

    Two people have resigned from the Hillsborough County Diversity Advisory Council after the inclusion of David McCallister, a leader of the local branch of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.
  3. Everyone on Twitter is making this same eclipse joke

    Blogs

    Today's total solar eclipse is, of course, a social media event as much as it is a natural phenomenon. Twitter even rolled out an #eclipse hashtag that automatically adds an eclipse emoji.

    The solar eclipse is inspiring Twitter humor.
  4. Live video: See how the solar eclipse is unfolding across the country

    Space

    Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the midday sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century.

    The moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, in Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. [Bill Ingalls | NASA via AP]
  5. Photo gallery: First images of the total solar eclipse

    Space

    Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the midday sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century.

    The moon covers the sun during a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore.  [Ted S. Warren | Associated Press]