Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Dunedin's Tattoo launches a week of Scottish culture, competition and fun

Berkeley Prep’s Highlander Band, of Tampa, puts a rock spin on their Celtic-style music at the Dunedin Military Tattoo. The guitarists, from left, are Toby McAdams, Connor Stonesifer and Will Allread. The week will culminate with the Highland Games.

TERRI BRYCE REEVES | Special to the Times

Berkeley Prep’s Highlander Band, of Tampa, puts a rock spin on their Celtic-style music at the Dunedin Military Tattoo. The guitarists, from left, are Toby McAdams, Connor Stonesifer and Will Allread. The week will culminate with the Highland Games.

DUNEDIN — Performers were dressed to the kilt Saturday night, as the Dunedin Highland Games and Festival Committee presented its annual Military Tattoo, a musical massing of Scottish clans, flags, bands and Celtic dancers.

The Tattoo kicks off a week of Scottish-themed parties and events, with the biggest and brawniest celebration, the 43rd annual Dunedin Highland Games and Festival, scheduled for this Saturday.

The Tattoo was held in the Memorial Stadium at Dunedin High School, where the "ancient" castle — a plywood relic about 25 years old — had been replaced with a new one.

"It had seen its day," said Frank Cioffi, spokesman for the Dunedin Highland Games and Festival Committee.

The new gray structure was fashioned from 24 panels of polystyrene foam and aluminum, making it much lighter, sturdier, durable and easier to erect and dismantle, he said.

A plethora of piping and drum bands passed through its entryway onto the field and played favorites like Amazing Grace and Scotland the Brave.

The Berkeley Preparatory School Highlander Band from Tampa put a rock spin on its Celtic-style music with some help from their electric guitarists Toby McAdams, Connor Stonesifer and Will Allread.

The band is the Piping Association of North America's newest member; this was the group's inaugural field show.

And, it was announced that this was the first time Dunedin Highland Middle School Band performed as an "entirely kilted unit," thanks to fundraising efforts and donations.

Sandy Keith, president of the Highland Games and Festival Committee, said the focus this year was on dance.

"We thought we'd mix things up a bit," he said.

Dance groups came from Spring Hill, Dunedin, Tampa and as far as Nova Scotia.

The Celtic Touch Dancers of Canada raised funds for two years to make a trip to Florida, said Cioffi. They will perform at Disney World this week and return to compete in Saturday's Highland Games in Highlander Park.

The Stephen Scariff Irish Dancers of Tampa added some spice with their flying footwork and Riverdance-style leaps.

Dee Stultz was introduced as this year's Chief of the Games. She was a Highlands dancer and teaches line dancing at the Largo Recreation Center and at the Scottish American Society. She has five children and five grandchildren.

Last year, the show ended abruptly after the heavens opened up with rain about halfway through the program.

But as bad weather threatened Saturday's Tattoo, the Dunedin Highland Games Committee decided to slash gate prices from $15 to $10 per ticket.

"Many of our guests were thankful for the reduced ticket cost, especially in these difficult economic times," Cioffi wrote in an e-mail.

Proceeds from the Tattoo and Highland Games help support the three Scottish bands of Dunedin: the City of Dunedin Pipe Band and Dunedin's high school and middle school bands.

"This is the only Tattoo held in Florida," said Mike Dunlap, president of International New World Celts with almost 2,000 members. "Dunedin is unofficially Florida's Scottish capital."

Terri Bryce Reeves can be reached at treeves@tampabay.rr.com.

Dunedin's Tattoo launches a week of Scottish culture, competition and fun 03/30/09 [Last modified: Monday, March 30, 2009 7:40pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. In advertising, marketing diversity needs a boost in Tampa Bay, nationally

    Business

    TAMPA — Trimeka Benjamin was focused on a career in broadcast journalism when she entered Bethune-Cookman University.

    From left, Swim Digital marketing owner Trimeka Benjamin discusses the broad lack of diversity in advertising and marketing with 22 Squared copywriter Luke Sokolewicz, University of Tampa advertising/PR professor Jennifer Whelihan, Rumbo creative director George Zwierko and Nancy Vaughn of the White Book Agency. The group recently met at The Bunker in Ybor City.
  2. Kushner to testify before two intelligence committees

    Politics

    WASHINGTON— President Donald Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner is set to make a second appearance on Capitol Hill — he will speak with the House Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, one day after he is scheduled to speak with Senate Intelligence Committee investigators behind closed doors.

    White House senior adviser Jared Kushner is scheduled to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee and the House Intelligence Committee. [Associated Press]
  3. Rays relishing surprise status

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — The Rays on Friday played their first post-All-Star Game contest at Tropicana Field while holding a playoff spot since Sept. 23, 2013.

    Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Alex Cobb (53) throwing in the first inning of the game between the Texas Rangers and the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. on Friday, July 21, 2017.
  4. Exhumation of Dalí's remains finds his mustache still intact

    World

    FIGUERES, Spain — Forensic experts in Spain have removed hair, nails and two long bones from Salvador Dalí's embalmed remains to aid a court-ordered paternity test that may enable a woman who says she is the surrealist artist's daughter to claim part of Dalí's vast estate.

    Salvador Dal? died in 1989 leaving vast estate.
  5. Sessions discussed Trump campaign-related matters with Russian ambassador, U.S. intelligence intercepts show

    Politics

    WASHINGTON — Russia's ambassador to Washington told his superiors in Moscow that he discussed campaign-related matters, including policy issues important to Moscow, with Jeff Sessions during the 2016 presidential race, contrary to public assertions by the embattled attorney general, current and former U.S. …

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation after meetings with an ambassador were revealed.