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Florida candidates try to drive home their messages

The latest commercial from gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott shows him driving through distressed real estate areas, but he distressed me because it appears he's looking at the camera, not at where he's going.

Hey Rick, keep your eyes on the road. …

Florida attorney general candidate Pam Bondi turned out an impressive group at a political fundraiser last week at the Davis Islands home of Sandy and Dottie Berger MacKinnon.

No surprise for the former Hillsborough County prosecutor, but continuing to build statewide name recognition while holding her own here will be even more critical for Bondi.

Maybe we will be able to better measure her success July 16 when Tiger Bay Club of Tampa holds a debate among all the attorney general candidates. …

Look out for the Future Leaders Friday Luncheon group. After months of lunching with various folks, the young professionals recently held a reception that yielded top leaders such as Bucs vice president Bryan Glazer. …

Seen on a future bumper sticker: Sometimes It's Better To Live Like There Is A Tomorrow.

Readers Jeff and Barbi Kiser of Safety Harbor say they plan to bring that phrase to life. As Barbi says, given the times, it seems pertinent. To me, it also seems terribly poignant. …

The Tampa Independent Business Alliance kicked off Indie Week with a series of fundraisers Saturday night.

According to the alliance, local stores and restaurants generate more than three times the local economic activity of national chains, and create five times the revenue in local taxes.

Something to remember the next time you go shopping.

That's all I'm saying.

Florida candidates try to drive home their messages 06/27/10 [Last modified: Sunday, June 27, 2010 6:59pm]
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