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Her 102nd birthday brings two special treats

Four-year old Bailee Iorg of Knoxville, Tenn., gives 102-year-old Madaline Krater of Largo a hug. Both amputees, they share Nov. 28 as their birth date and were invited to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium on Nov. 26 for cake and to feed Winter, the tailless dolphin, who is learning to swim with a prosthetic tail.

Special to the Times

Four-year old Bailee Iorg of Knoxville, Tenn., gives 102-year-old Madaline Krater of Largo a hug. Both amputees, they share Nov. 28 as their birth date and were invited to the Clearwater Marine Aquarium on Nov. 26 for cake and to feed Winter, the tailless dolphin, who is learning to swim with a prosthetic tail.

Madeline Limegrover Krater of Largo celebrated her 102nd birthday with two special events. The first was a visit from her grandniece and family of Atlanta, and the second was a day at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium, visiting Winter, the tailless dolphin. The aquarium treated Mrs. Krater and another birthday celebrant, 4-year old Knoxville resident Bailee Iorg, both amputees, to birthday cake and an opportunity to feed Winter, who is learning to swim with a prosthetic tail.

Mrs. Krater was an identical twin born Nov. 28, 1906 in Pittsburgh, to Joseph and Catherine Limegrover.

She graduated from Miss Connelly's School for Girls in Pittsburgh and went into federal office work. From 1925 to 1949 she was employed as a court reporter, was secretary to the Administrator of Solid Fuels in Altoona, Pa., and worked for the Veterans Administration.

She married F. Wallace "Wally" Krater in 1929. She and Mr. Krater, along with her identical twin sister and family, co-owned and operated Campbells Mills Park, a Pennsylvania vacation resort that was destroyed in the Great Johnstown Flood of 1936.

The Kraters relocated to this area in 1975 and settled in the Palm Hill Country Club area of Largo where she enjoyed playing golf and bridge. She and Mr. Krater traveled often until his death in 1986. She lived independently until 1999, and now lives with her niece, Madelon Speer.

Mrs. Krater likes to sew, resumed piano lessons at 89, and drove her car until the age of 92.

• • •

Ed and Betty Maguire of Dunedin celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary at their home with family and friends.

Both were born and educated in Philadelphia and were married there Oct. 30, 1943, in St. Vincent Church.

During World War II, Mr. Maguire was a member of the Army's 33rd Ordnance Bomb Disposal Squad and spent time in England, France, Luxemburg and Belgium. He was among the troops at the Omaha Beach landing in Normandy and received five bronze stars while serving in the European Theater.

Mrs. Maguire graduated from St. Mary's Academy and in 1941 from Rosemont College.

After retiring as co-founder and CEO of Maguire and McLernon Inc., a Baltimore industrial distributor, the couple moved to Dunedin.

They have five children, 11 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

• • •

Joseph and Evelyn Bartoszek of Largo met as children growing up in the same Camden, N.J., neighborhood. They married Nov. 24, 1948, in Camden, and recently celebrated 60 years of marriage.

Mr. Bartoszek enlisted in the Army at a young age and became a member of the 22nd Infantry. He attended anti-aircraft training in Wellfleet, Mass., became an instructor in .30- and .50-caliber machine guns, taught swimming and was schooled in scout and raider training. Upon his deployment to England in 1944, he was part of the Fourth Division 22nd Infantry that landed on Utah Beach in France. Wounded on the way to Cherbourg, he returned to the States and was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his discharge, Mr. Bartoszek worked 11 years for the United States Postal Service and 30 years for Greyhound Bus Lines.

Mrs. Bartoszek graduated from high school in 1944 and attended nursing school at West Jersey Hospital. During her career, she has worked in hospitals, nursing homes and doctor's offices.

She is an active member of the Federated Republican Club, the Greater Largo Republican Club, and the Executive Committee of the Republican Party of Pinellas County. She's received the Mac Norcross award for outstanding support of the Republican party. She began sending packages to the 22nd Infantry in 2003 and has sent more than 1,000 so far, enlisting the held of friends, family and Republican Club members.

The couple are members of St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church, Largo.

They have two children, and two grandchildren.

Her 102nd birthday brings two special treats 12/02/08 [Last modified: Thursday, November 4, 2010 10:46am]
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