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Hernando County lost many notable residents in 2009

Tom Price, ice cream truck driver, waits for children at the Deltona Elementary School Summer Camp to buy ice cream.

WILL VRAGOVIC | Times (2006)

Tom Price, ice cream truck driver, waits for children at the Deltona Elementary School Summer Camp to buy ice cream.

Hernando County lost many notable residents during 2009, people who in ways large and small made the community a better place. Today, we remember them and their contributions.

Jan. 7: Lee Gordon, 62, Brooksville, longtime choir director at Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church, Brooksville.

Jan. 19: Steve Van Slyke, 58, Brooksville, real estate appraiser and former president of the Hernando County Association of Realtors.

Jan. 28: David Sturgill, 61, Spring Hill, real estate agent with Century 21 in Spring Hill and aviation enthusiast.

Feb. 10: Bob DeWitt, 69, Brooksville, longtime Realtor and member of the Hernando County Planning and Zoning Commission.

Feb. 19: Capt. Scott Bierwiler, Spring Hill, 42, a 22-year veteran of the Hernando County Sheriff's Office.

Feb. 24: Thomas Deen, 83, Brooksville, former Moton Elementary School principal who served 38 years with the Hernando County school system.

March 6: Evelyn DeHart, 92, Brooksville, longtime mental health activist credited with bringing a chapter of the National Alliance of Mental Illness to Hernando County.

March 7: Jake Baird, 74, Spring Hill, longtime member of the Gulf Coast Homing Club pigeon racing club in Spring Hill.

March 9: Hal Neely, 88, Brooksville, record producer and former manager for R&B star James Brown.

March 11: Mary Swan, 68, Spring Hill, 1950s teen pop singer and noted local entertainer best known for her recording of My Heart Belongs to You.

March 13: Dennis Gill, 60, decorated Vietnam War veteran and commander of Veterans Of Foreign Wars Post 9236.

April 16: John W. Sanders, 73, Lee County, former Hernando school superintendent who served from 1996 to 2001.

April 24: Paul Clemons, 76, Spring Hill, longtime pastor at Grace Presbyterian Church.

May 9: Tom Price, 72, Brooksville, ice cream vendor known to many simply as "the Ice Cream Man."

May 24: Joe Johnston Jr., 86, Brooksville, longtime attorney who, along with representing the city of Brooksville and the Hernando County School Board, served a term as state senator.

June 17: Michael Martin, 50, Spring Hill, notorious New York subway graffiti artist during the 1970s who signed his work, "Iz the Wiz".

June 19: L.R. Huffstetler, 70, who served 15 years as a Circuit Court judge in Hernando County.

June 29: Bertie A. "B.A." Crum, 91, Brooksville, pioneer family rancher who served nearly a quarter decade on the School Board.

July 24: Army Spc. Justin Dean Coleman, 21, Hernando Beach, the result of wounds suffered during a fight with insurgents in Afghanistan.

Sept. 4: James Parkhill, 84, Seminole, former builder who served on the Hernando County Planning and Zoning Commission and the East Hernando Fire District Advisory Board during the 1980s.

Sept. 7: Dr. Richard Henry, 83, Brooksville, well-known family physician and former chief of staff of Lykes Memorial Hospital.

Sept. 9: Robert Sayers, 39, Spring Hill, two-year veteran patrol officer with the Clermont Police Department.

Sept. 10: Pat Fleck, 80, pioneer Spring Hill resident and business activist who helped start the West Hernando Chamber of Commerce.

Oct. 26: David Russell Sr., 82, Brooksville, former one-term Hernando County commissioner and father of current commissioner and former Florida House member, David Russell Jr.

Nov. 9: Renee Whaley, 66, Spring Hill, longtime advocate for children with disabilities.

Dec. 19: Charles "Chuck'' Drawdy, 76, rancher and horse trainer who helped train horses for the Hernando County Sheriff's Office.

Hernando County lost many notable residents in 2009 12/30/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 9:36pm]
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