Q&A | Major League Baseball draft

Major League Baseball draft Q&A

Unlike the pro football draft, Major League Baseball chooses its new players with relatively little hoopla. Here are some details about how baseball picks its future stars — and a look at some local player prospects.

Where and how does the draft take place?

The 30 clubs draft in reverse order of finish, regardless of league, during a conference call conducted from the commissioner's office in New York. Pre-draft trades or compensation can alter the order of selection.

Who is eligible for the draft?

Players who are residents of the United States and its territories or Canada. That also includes foreign players who have enrolled in high school or college in this country.

Can any player in college be drafted?

No. If the player is at a four-year university, they are eligible after their junior or senior year or if they are 21 or older. Players in junior college may be drafted after either their freshman or sophomore seasons.

Baseball America is predicting that Riverview High School pitcher Anthony Ferrara will go somewhere around the sixth round, but there are a few other area players who might hear their name next week.

Kris Castellanos, Newsome: Injuries derailed his junior year, but Castellanos bounced back and signed with Florida State during his senior season. With a fastball in the low 90 mph range, Castellanos fanned 87 batters in 49 innings this season.

Kyle Parker, Newsome: Parker, a pitcher who also played quarterback for the football team, is signed to play for USF next season. He's an excellent athlete with a strong arm.

Aaron Gerbasi, Plant City: The University of Tampa locked up Gerbasi in the early signing period, but his draft slot could have a major impact on whether he ever shows up at UT.

Major League Baseball draft Q&A 05/29/08 [Last modified: Thursday, October 28, 2010 3:10pm]

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