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More politicians should engage in Facebook dialogue

I generally advise against discussing politics on Facebook.

Unless you're a politician.

It's a risky proposition because tone and inflection can be misinterpreted, and responses can bite with ferocity, contain misleading information or even fracture friendships.

But frankly, I don't think we hear enough everyday thoughts from elected officials and Facebook helps fill the void.

Hillsborough County Commissioner Mark Sharpe recently posted this thought-provoking nugget: "FL's drive to shift from service to high wage information economy depends on superb education. Stick w/highest standards & provide resources."

Of course, the post elicited stinging commentaries on our education system, but it's welcomed dialogue and a nice departure from deep discussions about "Kimye."

St. Petersburg City Councilman Wengay Newton posted his endorsement of mayoral candidate Kathleen Ford, and some immediately disagreed. Newton, to his credit, responded.

These exchanges come across as more genuine than carefully worded mailers. More elected officials should join the chorus. ...

Seen on a bumper sticker: Occupy Bacon.

State Rep. Janet Cruz, D-Tampa, expects 1,200 job seekers to attend her fourth annual job fair 10 a.m. Tuesday at Higgins Hall, 5225 Himes Ave. Ninety employers will be waiting. ...

Regardless of the attendance woes, the Tampa Bay Rays have become the area's favorite sports team. Check the TV ratings. They need only find a home closer to Tampa, but not necessarily in Tampa, to complete the puzzle. For now, they are a joy to watch — anywhere and everywhere.

That's all I'm saying.

More politicians should engage in Facebook dialogue 07/28/13 [Last modified: Sunday, July 28, 2013 9:37pm]
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